News | Neuro Imaging | May 17, 2019

New Study Evaluates Head CT Examinations and Patient Complexity

Frequent diagnoses of “dizziness and giddiness” and “headache” suggest ICD-10 codes do not accurately reflect complex patient cases

New Study Evaluates Head CT Examinations and Patient Complexity

May 17, 2019 — Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special X-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, dizziness and other symptoms of the brain. A new study, published online in Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology,1 evaluates the complexity of patients undergoing head-CT examinations.

The study was led by lead author Melissa M. Chen, M.D., a clinical neuroradiologist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Chen and her co-investigators used 2017 Medicare claims data to identify the most common site for performing head-CT examinations. After finding the most common site was emergency departments (ED), the authors classified the data by the complexity of the patient's ED visit. The visits were analyzed by the level of complexity (1-least complex to 5-most complex patient) as well as the diagnosis reported on the billed head CT claims.

"Of the 6,363,404 head-CT exams in 2017, 56.1 percent were performed in the ED and 70 percent of non-contrast exams performed in the ED were ordered in the most complex patient encounters (level 5 visits)," said Chen. "The most common diagnosis reported for head-CT scans without contrast agents in level 5 visits were ‘dizziness and giddiness,’ and for head-CT without and with contrast agents was ‘headache.’"

"Head-CT is not only most frequently ordered in the ED, but also during the most complex ED visits, suggesting that the ICD-10 codes associated with such exams do not appropriately reflect patient complexity," stated coauthor Ryan Lee, M.D., a radiologist at Einstein Healthcare Network, "The valuation process should also consider the complexity of associated billed patient encounters."

For more information: www.journals.elsevier.com/current-problems-in-diagnostic-radiology

Reference

1. Chen M.M., Hirsch J.A., Lee R.K., et al. Determining the Patient Complexity of Head CT Examinations: Implications for Proper Valuation of a Critical Imaging Service. Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology, May 10, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1067/j.cpradiol.2019.05.007

Related Content

Infervision's newly FDA approved CT lung AI application sets a new standard
News | Artificial Intelligence | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — Infervision announced U.S.
Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — An open-access Ameri
A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — With increased lung CT exam paradigms being used in the current...
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
This is Figure 2 from the article in Radiology: Acute encephalopathy. A 60 year-old-man without history of seizures presenting with convulsion. (A-B) Multifocal areas of FLAIR hyperintensity in the right cerebellum (arrows in A), left anterior cingular cortex and superior frontal gyrus (arrows in B). (C-D) Restricted diffusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal and middle temporal gyrus (arrows in D) and right cerebellum (arrows in E), consistent with cerebellar diaschisis. F)  #COVID19

This is Figure 2 from the article in Radiology: Acute encephalopathy. A 60 year-old-man without history of seizures presenting with convulsion. (A-B) Multifocal areas of FLAIR hyperintensity in the right cerebellum (arrows in A), left anterior cingular cortex and superior frontal gyrus (arrows in B). (C-D) Restricted diffusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal and middle temporal gyrus (arrows in D) and right cerebellum (arrows in E), consistent with cerebellar diaschisis. F) No hemosiderin deposits in gradient echo sequences.

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 06, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Four recent radiology studies, from New York, Italy, Iran and China, show how...
This data represents wave 2 of a QuickPoLL survey conducted in partnership with an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 01, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
Imaging Artificial Intelligence (AI) provider Qure.ai announced its first US FDA 510(k) clearance for its head CT scan product qER. The US Food and Drug Administration's decision covers four critical abnormalities identified by Qure.ai's emergency room product.
News | Artificial Intelligence | June 30, 2020
June 30, 2020 — Imaging Artificial Intelligence (AI) provider Qure.ai announced its first US FDA 510(k) clearance for
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane