News | Cardiac Imaging | August 28, 2019

New MRI Technique Spots Heart Muscle Scarring Without Kidney Damage

3D MRI computing can measure strain in the heart using image registration method without gadolinium

Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame

Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame. The three patients (V6, V10, V16) with different left-ventricle walls are shown. Point-to-surface distance is a measure to estimate the distance of a point from the reference surface. Image courtesy of WMG, University of Warwick

The 3DTag MRI volume and segmented LV mesh

The 3DTag MRI volume and segmented LV mesh. Image courtesy of WMG, University of Warwick.

August 28, 2019 — A new 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computing technique developed by scientists in WMG at the University of Warwick focuses on hierarchical template matching (HTM) to diagnose cardiac disease without the use of gadolinium contrast. The technique is explored in an article in the journal Scientific Reports.1

MRI has long been used to diagnose cardiomyopathy, heart attacks, irregular heartbeats and other heart disease. Traditionally when a patient goes for an MRI scan they are given a dose of gadolinium, which reacts with the magnetic field of the scanner to produce an image of the protons in the metal realigning with the field. The faster the protons realign, the brighter the image features to show where the dead muscles are in the heart and what the diagnosis is. 

The dose of gadolinium, however, can have detrimental effects to other parts of the body, particularly the risk of kidney failure. 

The hierarchical template matching technique involves:

  • A numerically stable technique of left ventricular (LV) myocardial tracking;
  • A 3-D extension of local weighted mean function to transform MRI pixels; and
  • A 3-D extension of the HTM model for myocardial tracking problems.

Use of this technique eliminates the need for gadolinium, reducing the risk of damage to other organs. 

Prof. Mark Williams from WMG at the University of Warwick said, “Using 3D MRI computing technique we can see in more depth what is happening to the heart, more precisely to each heart muscle, and diagnose any issues such as remodeling of the heart that causes heart failure. The new method avoids the risk of damaging the kidney opposite to what traditional methods do by using gadolinium.” 

Jayendra Bhalodiya, who conducted the research from WMG, University of Warwick added, “This new MRI technique also takes away stress from the patient, as during an MRI the patient must be very still in a very enclosed environment, meaning some people suffer from claustrophobia and have to stop the scan. Often when they do this they have to administer another dose of the damaging gadolinium and start again. This technique doesn’t require a dosage of anything, as it tracks the heart naturally.”

For more information: www.nature.com

Related Content

FDA Approves Bayer's Gadavist Contrast for Cardiac MRI in Adult Coronary Artery Disease Patients

Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce Gadolinium Contrast

The Debate Over Gadolinium MRI Contrast Toxicity

Reference

1. Bhalodiya J.M., Palit A., Ferrante E., et al. Hierarchical Template Matching for 3D Myocardial Tracking and Cardiac Strain Estimation. Nature Scientific Reports, published online Aug. 28, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48927-2

Related Content

National Imaging Solutions, a recognized leader in medical imaging and radiology solutions, announced it has acquired DynaRad — the oldest manufacturer of portable X-ray systems in the US. This new investment will allow National Imaging Solutions to support its customers by supplying them with DynaRad portable X-ray machines, including a mobile field X-ray device using nanotube technology.
News | Radiology Business | May 11, 2021
May 11, 2021 — ...
New Module Creates a Warped MRI Scan that Matches Real-Time Ultrasound Results (Graphic: Business Wire)

New Module Creates a Warped MRI Scan that Matches Real-Time Ultrasound Results (Graphic: Business Wire)

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 07, 2021
3D aMRI not only provides a stunning look inside the "beating brain", but it can also measure this physiological motion in all directions. Here, the amplitude of brain motion is overlayed for each brain slice and orientation in 3D. Image credit: 3D aMRI method outlined in Abderezaei et al. Brain Multiphysics (2021); Terem et al. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2021).

3D aMRI not only provides a stunning look inside the "beating brain", but it can also measure this physiological motion in all directions. Here, the amplitude of brain motion is overlayed for each brain slice and orientation in 3D. Image credit: 3D aMRI method outlined in Abderezaei et al. Brain Multiphysics (2021); Terem et al. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2021).

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 06, 2021
May 6, 2021 — Magnetic Resonance Imaging
After radiosurgery concurrent with nivolumab in 59-year-old patient with melanoma BM (patient 1; Supplemental Tables 3 and 5), F-18 FET PET at follow-up 12 weeks after treatment initiation (bottom row) shows significant decrease of metabolic activity (TBRmean, ?28%) compared with baseline (top row), although MRI changes were consistent with progression according to iRANO criteria. Reduction of metabolic activity was associated with stable clinical course over 10 mo. CE = contrast-enhanced. Image created by

After radiosurgery concurrent with nivolumab in 59-year-old patient with melanoma BM (patient 1; Supplemental Tables 3 and 5), F-18 FET PET at follow-up 12 weeks after treatment initiation (bottom row) shows significant decrease of metabolic activity (TBRmean, ?28%) compared with baseline (top row), although MRI changes were consistent with progression according to iRANO criteria. Reduction of metabolic activity was associated with stable clinical course over 10 mo. CE = contrast-enhanced. Image created by N. Galldiks et al., Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany.

News | PET Imaging | May 05, 2021
May 5, 2021 — For patients with brain metastases, amino acid ...
The contrast agents global market is expected to grow at a high single digit CAGR from 2020 to 2027 to reach $7,033.5 million by 2027 due to the increasing incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases and demand for diagnostic and interventional radiology procedures, increase in aging population, expansion of contrast agent indications, the growth of medical imaging in the emerging market, increasing research activities and favorable reimbursement

image courtesy of Guerbet

News | Contrast Media | May 03, 2021
Chemical substances that improve the visibility of specific organs, tissues, or blood vessels during a diagnostic or
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 30, 2021
April 30, 2021 — Canon Medical is bringing the power of accessible...
The Women’s Heart Attack Research Program (HARP) study shows combining OCT and cardiac MRI can help detect the underlying cause of heart attacks in women who did not have blocked arteries.

The Women’s Heart Attack Research Program (HARP) study shows combining OCT and cardiac MRI can help detect the underlying cause of heart attacks in women who did not have blocked arteries.

News | Cardiac Imaging | April 30, 2021
April 30, 2021 — In almost 10 percent of...
Using ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with #Down_syndrome (#DS), #researchers from #CaseWesternReserveUniversity, #ClevelandClinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the #hippocampus—a region of the #brain tied to memory and learning.

Using ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with Down syndrome (DS), researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus—a region of the brain tied to memory and learning.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | April 29, 2021
April 29, 2021 — Using...