Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 11, 2015

Neuroreader Software Speeds Detection of Brain Volume Changes

Software generates automated report on 45 brain structures to aid early diagnosis of degenerative brain disease

Brainreader, Neuroreader, brain volume changes, degenerative brain diseases, early diagnosis

August 11, 2015 — Brainreader, a Danish medical device company, announced the launch of its new software product that has the potential to speed the detection of changes in a patient's brain volume. These are a key indicator in the diagnosis of degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy and depression.

The software, Neuroreader, also can help identify changes in brain volume associated with concussions and other traumatic brain injuries.

In use by a growing number of radiologists and neuroradiologists in the United States and Europe, Neuroreader analyzes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients' brains and benchmarks them against a U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared database of healthy brain tissues in a matter of minutes. The software measures 45 specific structures within the brain.

"Brain scans are typically analyzed visually by radiologists in what can be a time-consuming process, especially when changes in brain volume are slight," said Jamila Ahdidan, Ph.D., founder and chief technology officer of Brainreader. "When looking for changes as small as hundredths of a millimeter, a software-driven analysis allows for these tiny changes to be detected in minutes."

For more than 30 years, since the development of the MRI scanner, physicians have ordered MRI scans of the brain to identify traumatized, diseased or atrophied tissue.

"Radiologists rely on our human pattern recognition to identify tiny abnormalities in patients' brains," said Barton Branstetter, M.D., neuroradiologist at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Presbyterian. "But even the best radiologist cannot precisely determine the volume of every structure in the brain without hours of intensive manual calculations. Neuroreader gives us easy, reliable, reproducible volume measurements and takes the guesswork out of analyzing structures in our patients' brains."  

When treating a patient with signs of neurodegenerative diseases, the physician simply uploads the MR image to the Brainreader server. Neuroreader then analyzes the MRI scan and delivers a report in less than five minutes, indicating which brain structures' volume are abnormal and to what extent. The software, which has an intuitive interface, produces an easily interpreted automated report.

One of the brain structures analyzed is the hippocampus, the measurement of which is vital in determining a person's ability to maintain strong cognitive function, according to neurologist and Alzheimer's disease expert Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., chairman, NeuroGrow Brain Fitness Center, McLean, Virginia, and Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore.

"Measuring the size of the hippocampus is the single most important factor in determining a person's prognosis for having strong memory performance in the future," said Fotuhi. "That's where the Neuroreader comes in. It's a major breakthrough in establishing an accurate measurement of this part of the brain."

According to Fotuhi, the Neuroreader will help him and his colleagues diagnose patients early for degenerative brain diseases and to create treatment plans that can not only slow the loss of brain tissue, but even to build it back up.  "In the future, I believe it will become routine for patients - and their doctors - to know the volume of their hippocampus and to have it monitored regularly," he said.

According to Dale E. Bredesen, M.D., Augustus Rose Professor of Neurology at UCLA, and founding president and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging: "Recent publications have offered some of the first evidence for functional, sustained improvement in neurodegenerative conditions, and the ability to quantitate multiple brain region volumes reproducibly and longitudinally will be critical as therapeutic programs are being refined. Neuroreader is perfectly suited for this."

Neuroreader, which is sold as software-as-a-service, is available to hospitals radiology and neuroradiology departments on a pay-per-use or subscription model tailored to the healthcare organization's wishes.

For more information: www.brainreader.net

Related Content

International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
SyMRI Software Receives FDA Clearance for Use With Siemens MRI Systems
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 14, 2019
SyntheticMR announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for clinical use of its SyMRI Image and SyMRI...
Materialise Receives FDA Clearance for Cardiovascular Planning Software Suite
Technology | Advanced Visualization | June 13, 2019
Three-dimensional (3-D) printing software and solutions company Materialise has received U.S. Food and Drug...
Medivis SurgicalAR Gets FDA Clearance
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 10, 2019
Medivis announced that its augmented reality (AR) technology platform for surgical applications, SurgicalAR, has...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
Study Identifies MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy as Growing Market Segment
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 06, 2019
Revenues from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy systems market exceeded $220 million in...
Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019
SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially...

Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Feature | Radiology Business | May 31, 2019 | By Arjen Radder
Change is a consistent theme in our world today, no matter where you look.
MRI Metal Artifact Reduction Poses Minimal Thermal Risk to Hip Arthroplasty Implants
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 23, 2019
Clinical metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols at 3 Tesla (3T) on hip...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res