News | August 13, 2009

MEDRAD’s Continuum MR Infusion System Adds Disposables Set

August 13, 2009 - MEDRAD has introduced an eight-piece microbore disposables set for the Continuum MR Infusion System, which it is featuring at the AHRA meeting.

The disposables set reduces the priming volume of pharmaceuticals used and, as a result, reduces procedure cost.

The disposables set extends ease of providing MRI access and improves workflow when caring for medication-dependent patients.

The disposables set also extends clinicians ability to provide more immediate care in MRI for ER, critical care and trauma patients. Without proper equipment and disposables, sites must initiate workarounds for delivering patient medications through a pump placed outside the scan room with multiple lengths of extension tubing.

Additional benefits that the disposables in the new set deliver to clinicians include:

- Improved workflow efficiency
- Capability to have backup sedation medication source
- Clear y-connectors that allow for visual air detection
- Thick-wall tubing that decreases the probability of occlusion factors
- Ability to increase the types and numbers of applications performed

The Continuum MR Infusion System and the wireless remote display enable clinicians to manage a patient’s medication infusion during a magnetic resonance (MR) procedure from both inside and outside the scan room. When changes are needed, including flow rate, bolus, or to start or stop the infusion altogether, clinicians can control these parameters without interrupting the MRI scan using the wireless remote display featuring a color touch screen.
• Continuum Wireless joins the Veris MR Monitor as the second product to utilize MEDRAD’s Certo MR Wireless Network. The original Continuum MR Infusion System was introduced in 2002 as the first infusion system designed for the challenging electro-magnetic environment in MR. MEDRAD has designed an upgrade path to wireless for current Continuum users.

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