News | April 23, 2014

Medibord Designs, Supplies First CT Positioning Board for Animal Scans

Mediboard GE Healthcare CT Systems Positioning Board

April 23, 2014 — The Animal Health Trust (AHT) required a non-carbon fiber, flat positioning board for its GE Healthcare CT Brivo 385 system to enable it to perform radiotherapy planning for dogs and cats from computed tomography (CT) scans.

Medibord Ltd. manufactures a range of lightweight, fiber-reinforced, thermoplastic boards suited for a number of applications in the medical sector. For this particular project, Medibord worked closely with GE Healthcare to design and manufacture a customized board that would meet the specific requirements of AHT and its Brivo 385 CT scanner.

The Medibord CT board has enabled vets at the AHT to position the animal in place with the precision that is required for the computer-aided radiotherapy planning. Being almost completely radiolucent, there is no deleterious effect on image quality and the board can be left in place for patients undergoing CT for diagnostic purposes rather than radiotherapy planning. A further advantage of the board is that it increases the width of the patient couch, facilitating patient positioning.

Clinical trials have been conducted on the CT board and results have demonstrated that the material performs as well as or better than carbon fiber in regards to attenuation and have radiolucency properties similar to carbon alternatives. As the Medibord CT boards have flexible design feasibilities, the board is not restricted to the CT machine and can be moved and used within multiple modalities. 

For more information: www.mediboard.com

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