News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 25, 2020

Launch of Diagnostic Imaging Learning Platform for COVID-19

PACS provider IMAGE Information Systems launches www.disAIblecorona.com to offer the radiology community a place to collect and to share worldwide coronavirus cases to learn from and fight the disease

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

March 25, 2020 — IMAGE Information Systems launched a diagnostic imaging learning platform for COVID-19 cases. Studies have shown that COVID-19 can be detected by means of chest computed tomography (CT) scans, even before the first symptoms begin to show. CT scans are important to monitor the disease and to predict the outcome. This requires, however, a certain level of experience and training which is barely seen as we are dealing with a novel virus. The newly created website www.disAIblecorona.com aims at providing the radiology community with scientific medical imaging facts about COVID-19 disease and the latest corona-related information. Regular teaching websites include single image extractions, only. A dedicated learning area with full cases was implemented to offer the radiology community a forum to build up and share anonymous corona cases from around the world to learn from and fight the disease.

For more information: www.image-systems.biz

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