News | Stroke | July 13, 2018

iSchemaView Brings RAPID Imaging Platform to Australia and New Zealand

Diagnostic Imaging Australia will be exclusive distributor of imaging solution that provides automated scoring and assessment of brain ischemia

iSchemaView Brings RAPID Imaging Platform to Australia and New Zealand

July 13, 2018 – iSchemaView has signed Diagnostic Imaging Australia (DIA) to be the exclusive distributor for the RAPID cerebrovascular imaging analysis platform in Australia and New Zealand. Hospitals and clinics that treat ischemic stroke in these countries will now have access to RAPID’s automated computed tomography perfusion (CTP), magnetic resonance (MR), CT angiography (CTA) and ASPECTS solutions, with support from DIA’s customer service specialists in the region.

iSchemaView’s RAPID platform was recently used to select patients for two landmark stroke trials published in The New England Journal of Medicine, DAWN[1] and DEFUSE 3[2], that successfully treated patients up to 24 hours after onset. RAPID was the exclusive imaging tool used to aid in patient selection in both studies. The prior treatment window for mechanical thrombectomy was up to six hours. However, select patients with salvageable brain tissue identified through advanced imaging are now eligible for treatment up to 24 hours after they were last seen well.

The RAPID neuroimaging platform creates high-quality images from non-contrast CT, CT angiography, CT perfusion, and MRI diffusion and perfusion studies. The software provides an intuitive and easily interpretable real-time view of brain perfusion, allowing physicians to determine lesion volumes for a wide variety of different thresholds. The platform includes four different imaging products, tailored to the particular needs of different types of facilities:

  • RAPID MRI provides fully automated, easy-to-interpret diffusion and perfusion maps that identify brain areas with low ADC values, as well as delayed contrast arrival. RAPID MRI perfusion automatically quantifies regions of reduced cerebral blood flow, volume and transit time that exceed pre-specified thresholds;
  • RAPID CT perfusion automatically quantifies regions of reduced cerebral blood flow, volume and transit time that exceed pre-specified thresholds. Regions are color-coded and the volumes of interest are automatically measured. Maps (including mismatch maps) of the severity of Tmax delays are provided using a four-color-coded scale;
  • RAPID CTA automatically provides clear, easy-to-interpret CTA maps that include a colored overlay to identify brain regions with reduced blood vessel density. The severity of reduction can be readily visualized by a simple, four-color-coded scale. Additionally, a 3-D reconstruction of the vasculature allows physicians to rotate the image for optimal viewing of the vessels from multiple angles; and
  • RAPID ASPECTS automatically generates a standardized score — based on clinically validated machine learning algorithms — that enables physicians to easily communicate about the extent of a patient’s ischemic changes and to determine eligibility for thrombectomy (clot removal). In addition, RAPID ASPECTS provides clear visualization of the brain so that clinicians can better scrutinize each region and confirm the automated score.

 

For more information: www.irapid.com

References

1. Nogueira R.G., Jadhav A.P., Haussen D.C., et al. "Thrombectomy 6 to 24 Hours after Stroke with a Mismatch between Deficit and Infarct." New England Journal of Medicine, Jan. 4, 2018. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1706442

2. Albers G.W., Marks M.P., Kemp S., et al. "Thrombectomy for Stroke at 6 to 16 Hours with Selection by Perfusion Imaging." New England Journal of Medicine, Feb. 22, 2018. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1713973

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