News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 22, 2017

ClearRead CT Nearing 50 Installations Milestone

Technology processes all data from CT scans to help standardize care

ClearRead CT Nearing 50 Installations Milestone

June 22, 2017 — Riverain Technologies announced that it is now processing data from nearly 50 computed tomography (CT) scanners that include all major manufacturers with its ClearRead CT technology. The company said this includes leading centers such as Duke University Medical Center, Saint Luke’s Kansas City, Einstein Medical Center, University of Maryland and the University of Michigan.

With the radiologist’s increasing workload, tools that improve reading efficiency while increasing reading accuracy are imperative. Radiology centers and services are utilizing ClearRead CT as a way to standardize care based on proven reading benefits, ease of use and ease of installation. The software can perform all data processing while being read on the sites’ existing picture archiving and communication systems (PACS).

“Riverain’s ClearRead CT has been deployed as a part of our routine chest CT exams, including patients in our lung cancer screening program,” said Jared Christensen, M.D., Division Chief of Cardiothoracic Imaging and imaging director of Duke’s Lung Cancer Screening Program. “The ClearRead CT technology has helped us to detect lung nodules that may have otherwise been missed. Based upon our early experience, the workflow is faster and more accurate than existing technologies.”

ClearRead CT is the first advanced visualization product cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for concurrent reading, enabling radiologists to read the original series and the processed CT series simultaneously. ClearRead CT is proven to achieve a 26 percent reduction in reading time and reduce missed nodules by 29 percent, according to Riverain.

The software processes CT scans from all manufacturers and automatically places the processed series into the existing patient file prior to the exam review. The seamless integration and ability to process cases from varying acquisition devices and protocols allows the ClearRead CT technology to be deployed enterprise-wide, establishing a standard of care for the patient population.

“Using ClearRead CT couldn’t be easier,” said Charlie White, professor of radiology and vice chairman of clinical affairs, University of Maryland Medical Center. “Image processing is completed in the background so that our normal workflow isn’t interrupted.”

For more information: www.riveraintech.com

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