Technology | Contrast Media | December 12, 2017

Brainlab Contrast Clearance Analysis Software Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance

Scientists evaluate MR-based technology for differentiating treatment effects

Brainlab Contrast Clearance Analysis Software Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance

December 12, 2017 — Brainlab announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of its Contrast Clearance Analysis methodology, developed at Sheba Medical Center in Tel-Hashomer, Israel, with technology provided by Brainlab. The software analyzes magnetic resonance (MR) images to differentiate regions of efficient contrast clearance from regions with contrast accumulation in most cranial tumor patients to provide additional insight into post-treatment tumor characteristics.

“In conventional black and white MR images, it is often difficult to tell regions of high vascular activity apart from areas with damaged vasculature,” commented Yael Mardor, professor and chief scientist at The Advanced Technology Center of Sheba Medical Center. “Elements Contrast Clearance Analysis depicts contrast clearance efficiency of blood vessels in color to help clinicians better interpret the MR images and therefore support ongoing treatment assessment.”

Tissues that are highly vascularized and viable, such as active tumor tissue, are able to efficiently clear contrast agent within an hour of contrast injection. Conversely, regions consisting of damaged blood vessels, for example areas of necrosis, are unable to clear contrast agent as quickly, resulting in contrast accumulation. Based on this phenomenon, the software works by acquiring two MRI scans — one at 5 minutes and another at least one hour after injection of a standard dose of contrast agent — and intelligently subtracting the first series from the second to clearly show the difference between contrast clearance and accumulation.

“Elements Contrast Clearance Analysis has become part of our neuro-oncology team’s standard clinical practice, as it is simple, robust and complements our existing workflows,” commented Liam Welsh, M.D., consultant clinical oncologist at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. “We have found every one of the scans analyzed for contrast clearance to be of assistance in our clinical decision-making. In the 30 percent of cases in which a subsequent decision was made to move forward with neurosurgery, we have observed a strong correlation between predicted and histologically observed viable tumor.”

Elements Contrast Clearance Analysis can provide critical insight to a multitude of specialties including radiation oncology, neurosurgery, neuro-oncology and neuroradiology.

Watch the VIDEO "How Serious is MRI Gadolinium Retention in the Brain and Body?"

Read the article "Sectra Offers Gadolinium Tracking Functionality in DoseTrack Software"

For more information: www.brainlab.com

Related Content

Third FDA Clearance Announced for Zebra-Med's AI Solution for Brain Bleed Alerts
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 19, 2019
Zebra Medical Vision announced it has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for...
LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the presentation of two studies assessing the performance and accuracy of the company's...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
SyMRI Software Receives FDA Clearance for Use With Siemens MRI Systems
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 14, 2019
SyntheticMR announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for clinical use of its SyMRI Image and SyMRI...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
Study Identifies MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy as Growing Market Segment
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 06, 2019
Revenues from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy systems market exceeded $220 million in...
Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019
SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially...

Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Feature | Radiology Business | May 31, 2019 | By Arjen Radder
Change is a consistent theme in our world today, no matter where you look.
MRI Metal Artifact Reduction Poses Minimal Thermal Risk to Hip Arthroplasty Implants
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 23, 2019
Clinical metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols at 3 Tesla (3T) on hip...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res