Technology | Contrast Media | December 11, 2017

Sectra Offers Gadolinium Tracking Functionality in DoseTrack Software

Radiologists can now collect, store and monitor contrast injection data during MRI exams

Sectra Offers Gadolinium Tracking Functionality in DoseTrack Software

December 11, 2017 — Sectra recently announced the global introduction of gadolinium tracking in its dose monitoring solution, Sectra DoseTrack. Gadolinium is a contrast agent commonly used to enhance images during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams. By systematically registering gadolinium information, healthcare providers can reduce the risk of patients experiencing negative side effects of excessively high accumulated levels of gadolinium.

Sectra showcased Sectra DoseTrack, including this functionality, during the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 26-Dec. 1, 2017 in Chicago.

Ian Judd, product manager for Sectra DoseTrack, said by entering gadolinium injection information in the software, healthcare providers can ensure relevant information is available throughout the organization either from the electronic medical record (EMR), from the dose monitoring solution or in Sectra PACS (picture archiving and communication system).

Sectra DoseTrack allows healthcare providers to monitor patient radiation exposure and ensure that the radiation doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for increased patient safety. The cloud-based solution automatically collects, stores and monitors data from all connected modalities, saving time and facilitating robust analysis for dose optimization. It can be configured using local and national dose reference levels (DRLs) to allow healthcare organizations to ensure it is performing within expected thresholds.

Watch the VIDEO How Serious is MRI Gadolinium Retention in the Brain and Body?

Read the article FDA: No Harm in MRI Gadolinium Retention in the Brain

For more information: www.sectra.com

 

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