News | April 04, 2011 | Dave Fornell

Antioxidant Formula Prior to Radiation Exposure May Prevent DNA Injury

April 4, 2011 – A unique formulation of antioxidants taken orally before imaging with ionizing radiation minimizes cell damage, noted researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 36th Annual Scientific Meeting in Chicago. In what the researchers say is the first clinical trial of its kind, as much as a 50 percent reduction in DNA injury was observed after administering the formula prior to CT scans.

“In our initial small study, we found that pre-administering to patients a proprietary antioxidant formulation resulted in a notable dose-dependent reduction in DNA injury,” said Kieran J. Murphy, M.D., FSIR, professor and vice chair, director of research and deputy chief of radiology at the University of Toronto and University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. “This could play an important role in protecting adults and children who require imaging or a screening study.”

“Pre-administering this formula before a medical imaging exam may be one of the most important tools to provide radioprotection and especially important for patients in the getting CT scans,” said Murphy. The study’s data support the theory about a protective effect during these kinds of exposure.

“There is currently a great deal of controversy in determining the cancer risks associated with medical imaging exams. Although imaging techniques, such as CT scans and mammograms, provide crucial and often life-saving information to doctors and patients, they work by irradiating people with X-rays, and there is some evidence that these can, in the long run, cause cancer,” explained Murphy. The researchers responded to this patient need by exploring a way to protect individuals from these potentially harmful effects. This may be of importance to interventional and diagnostic radiologists and X-ray technologists who have occupational exposure also.

The small study showed that even though many antioxidants are poorly absorbed by the body, one particular mixture was effective in protecting against the specific type of injury caused by medical imaging exams. People are 70 percent water, and X-rays collide with water molecules to produce free radicals. These groups of atoms with an unpaired number of electrons are dangerous when they react with cellular components, causing damage and even cell death. Free radicals can go on to do damage by directly ionizing DNA and other cellular targets. The research team evaluated whether a special combination of antioxidants have an ability to neutralize these free radicals before they can do damage.

“Our intent was to develop an effective proprietary formula of antioxidants to be taken orally prior to exposure that can protect a patient’s DNA against free radical mediated radiation injury, and we have applied to patent this formulation and a specific dose strategy,” said Murphy.

The experiments measured DNA damage as a surrogate marker for DNA injury. Blood was drawn from two study volunteers in duplicate, creating four individual tests per data point. DNA strand breaks are repaired by a big protein complex that binds to the site of the damage. The researchers labeled one of the proteins with a fluorescent tag. Then, under a powerful 3-D microscope, the DNA is examined for signs of repair. The more repair that is seen, the more DNA damage must have been done by the CT scan to initiate that repair. The experiments showed a reduction of DNA repair in the treatment group, which means that there was less DNA injury as a result of pre-administering the antioxidant mixture.

The researchers concede that this is a small study and that a lot more research needs to be done. However, these initial results point toward a positive future for this kind of treatment. The group says the next step is a clinical trial in Toronto.

For more information: www.SIRweb.org

Related Content

Study Shows Biomarker Panel Boosts Lung Cancer Risk Assessment for Smokers
News | Lung Cancer | July 16, 2018
A four-protein biomarker blood test improves lung cancer risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon...
Breast Cancer Follow-up Imaging Varies Widely
News | Breast Imaging | July 13, 2018
July 13, 2018 — Follow-up imaging for women...
iSchemaView Brings RAPID Imaging Platform to Australia and New Zealand
News | Stroke | July 13, 2018
iSchemaView has signed Diagnostic Imaging Australia (DIA) to be the exclusive distributor for the RAPID cerebrovascular...
Lack of Insurance Coverage Delaying Proton Therapy Clinical Trials
News | Proton Therapy | July 12, 2018
Randomized clinical trials are the gold standard of cancer research and can shed light on whether innovative, new...
Zebra Medical Vision Announces FDA 510(k) Clearance of Coronary Calcium Algorithm
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 12, 2018
Zebra Medical Vision has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Coronary...
Breast Cancer Studies Ignore Race, Socioeconomic Factors
News | Women's Health | July 11, 2018
A new commentary appearing in the July issue of Cancer Causes & Control points to evidence that social factors help...
IAC Awards First CT Accreditation for a Mobile Stroke Unit
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 09, 2018
The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) recently recognized the University of Tennessee Health Science Center...
High-Strength MRI May Release Mercury from Amalgam Dental Fillings
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 05, 2018
Exposure to ultra-high-strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may release toxic mercury from amalgam fillings in...
Image courtesy of Philips

Image courtesy of Philips

Feature | Interventional Radiology | July 05, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
On May 14, 2018, First Lady Melania Trump underwent an embolization procedure for what was called a benign kidney...
Overlay Init