News | Enterprise Imaging | November 28, 2018

Vital Showcases Enterprise Imaging Advances at RSNA 2018

As company celebrates 30th anniversary, new offerings include photorealistic image visualization, automated stroke processing

Vital Showcases Enterprise Imaging Advances at RSNA 2018

Global Illumination from Vital Images

November 28, 2018 — Vital, a Canon Group company, will highlight the latest additions to its enterprise imaging portfolio at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago. In 2018, the company is also celebrating its 30th anniversary.

Global Illumination

New this year, Vital is introducing Global Illumination within the existing Vitrea Advanced Visualization workflows. Global Illumination delivers 3-D renderings that provide more photorealistic views of the human anatomy, and includes sharing the renderings as images, batches and movies. During RSNA 2018, attendees can get a hands-on demonstration of this highly responsive technology and see how Global Illumination is easy to use and offers real-world rendering that enriches communication among specialists, clinicians and patients.

Automated Stroke Processing

Automated Stroke Processing is a fast, accurate and affordable solution that streamlines acute care patient stroke protocols with a fully automated computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) post-processing application. Powered by Olea Medical, Automated Stroke Processing offers customizable reports containing instant volumetric estimation of brain tissue with abnormal hemodynamics, that may be delivered directly to users’ email.

Encounters-Based Imaging Workflow

The new Encounters-Based Imaging Workflow augments the traditional orders-driven imaging workflow. This advancement helps providers secure exam images acquired at the point of care to complete the patient’s clinical record and increase  charge-capture. This new workflow standard is fully supported by Vital's Enterprise Imaging solution.

Advanced Analytics Platform

This year at RSNA, Vital is introducing Codex, a platform component of the Vitrea Intelligence solution. With the addition of Codex, Vitrea Intelligence provides visual analysis of the data generated by imaging equipment. Unlocking the DICOM metadata provides the most comprehensive and accurate view of imaging operations available, according to Vital. Data stored in Codex version 1.1 visualizes using a new and flexible data visualization tool, enabling customers to create customized “cockpit” views of multiple key performance indicators (KPIs) simultaneously.

For more information: www.vitalimages.com

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