News | Orthopedic Imaging | November 09, 2017

Sectra to Provide Orthopedic Post-Operative Follow-Up for Teleradiology Company

Europe-based Telemedicine Clinic will submit CT images to Sectra Implant Movement Analysis to determine if loose implants are causing chronic pain

Sectra to Provide Orthopedic Post-Operative Follow-Up for Teleradiology Company

November 9, 2017 — International medical imaging IT and cybersecurity company Sectra recently signed an agreement with the global teleradiology provider Telemedicine Clinic (TMC). Through this agreement, Sectra can now offer its orthopedic customers access to the service Sectra Implant Movement Analysis. Radiologists at TMC will analyze images sent through Sectra’s online service to determine whether or not a patient’s implant is loose. This will enable orthopedists to understand post-operative chronic pain without performing surgery again, thereby cutting costs and reducing risk for the patients. Initially, Sectra and TMC will provide this service to orthopedic surgeons in Sweden.

Patients who have implants may experience chronic pain following orthopedic surgery. Sometimes, the pain is due to the fact that the implant is loose, or even broken. The new service enables detection of loose or broken implants earlier than with conventional radiographic examination. With the new agreement between Sectra and TMC, orthopedists can request two computed tomography (CT) images of the patient and digitally submit those to Sectra’s online service Sectra Implant Movement Analysis. Two low-dose CT images of the patient are taken: one in flexion and one in extension. Within 72 hours, the hospital receives a report that clearly states whether or not the implant is loose. The report also includes images, which enables orthopaedists to see where the implant is loose so that they can better plan surgery. Sectra Implant Movement Analysis is currently suitable for patients with hip, spine, or neck implants.

TMC is an international diagnostic group with offices in Reading, U.K.; Sydney, Australia; and Barcelona, Spain. TMC was established in 2002 to meet the increasing demand for diagnostic expertise in many European regions in which a scarcity of access to subspecialized radiologists has created problems in the delivery of healthcare services. Today, TMC’s medical team provides radiology reports to more than 135 European hospitals. TMC has used Sectra PACS (picture archiving and communication system) for its teleradiology business since 2007.

“We are proud that Sectra has chosen to work with TMC to deliver this valuable diagnostic service,” said Henrik Agrell, managing director for Telemedicine Clinic Scandinavia. “It is a recognition of our focus on quality and teleradiology provided by subspecialized radiologists. It is also a great opportunity for our radiologists to work with a new technology that will have a real impact on quality of care and healthcare costs.”

For more information: www.sectra.com

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