News | August 24, 2010

Research Shows Major Dose Reduction in Positron Emission Mammography

August 24, 2010 - In a recent study presented at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 52nd Annual Meeting, researchers at the University of Washington showed that 18FDG dose for Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) may be reduced by as much as 70 percent without altering image quality.

PEM scanners show the location as well as the metabolic phase of a lesion. The metabolic view assists physicians to make the optimal cancer care decision by providing an unprecedented ability to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions, what researchers term specificity.

PEM is different from x-ray mammography in that it is currently not used as a screening modality. Rather, it is deployed to confirm extent of disease in a patient already diagnosed with a primary breast cancer.

"PEM is used in women with known breast cancer in order to plan treatment," said Wendie Berg, M.D., breast imaging radiologist, Lutherville, Md. "Radiation for treatment of breast cancer uses doses which are roughly 5,000 times higher than a diagnostic PEM study. Minimizing radiation dose is still important for any patient, and we can likely cut the dose of PEM in half, but the benefit to proper treatment exceeds the still low risk from the radiation dose of PEM."

Lawrence MacDonald, research assistant professor in the department of radiology at the University of Washington, and his team presented results of a study to detect lesions with very low doses of radiation using the Naviscan PEM scanner.

Preliminary results using phantom images suggest that PEM lesion detection can be reduced down to approximately 3 mCi injected dose of 18FDG or three to four times lower than the dose commonly used in clinical practice, while maintaining lesion detectability.

"Naviscan believes that the radiation dose to patients who undergo PEM can be cut at least in half, if not more, as suggested by the University of Washington study," said Judy Kalinyak, M.D., medical director, Naviscan Inc. "Our site in Japan is already injecting 5 mCi of FDG compared to the 10 mCi in the U.S., and a recently published abstract in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine further validates the reduction in dose down to 5 mCi."

Results from a recent presentation at the Society of Nuclear Medicine on findings from a National Institute of Health (NIH)-sponsored clinical study comparing PEM with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) further demonstrate PEM's clinical appropriateness.

This multi-site study of hundreds of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer shows that PEM demonstrated a six percent improvement in specificity at comparably high sensitivity, and also recommended fewer unnecessary biopsies. These results are particularly significant for women who cannot tolerate an MRI exam and require an alternate imaging tool. The study is slated for publication in the December issue of the journal Radiology.

For more information: www.naviscan.com

Related Content

Study Demonstrates First Human Application of Novel PET Tracer for Prostate Cancer

Transaxial 11Csarcosine hybrid PET/CT showed a (triangulated) adenocarcinoma in the transition zone of the anterior right prostate gland on PET (A), CT (B), and a separately obtained T2?weighted MR sequence (C) with resulting PET/MRI registration (D). Image courtesy of M. Piert et al., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 16, 2017
In the featured translational article in the August issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers at the...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
Clinical Data Supports Use of Xoft System for Endometrial Cancer
News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 03, 2017
Researchers presented clinical data supporting use of the Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System for the...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area

NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area. Image courtesy of David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., University of Florida.

News | Neuro Imaging | July 31, 2017
Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson...
more healthcare providers and patients are choosing options such as Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery
News | Radiation Therapy | July 31, 2017
Each year, up to 650,000 people who were previously diagnosed with various forms of cancer will develop brain...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Breast Imaging | July 28, 2017
Nancy Cappello, Ph.D., executive director and founder of Are You Dense Inc. and Are You Dense Advocacy, explains how
"Residual Echo" of Ancient Humans May Hold Clues to Mental Disorders

MRI data shows (left) areas of the skull preferentially affected by the amount of Neanderthal-derived DNA and (right) areas of the brain’s visual system in which Neanderthal gene variants influenced cortex folding (red) and gray matter volume (yellow). Image courtesy of Michael Gregory, M.D., NIMH Section on Integrative Neuroimaging

News | Neuro Imaging | July 26, 2017
Researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have produced the first direct evidence that parts of...
New York Hospital Finds Significant Cost Savings With Toshiba’s Aquilion One CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 25, 2017
In five years, Kaleida Health’s Stroke Care Center (SCC) at the Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., has realized...
Overlay Init