News | Patient Engagement | August 21, 2020

New Survey Reveals High Demand for Telemedicine

August 2020 survey reveals 81% would choose telemedicine for next medical appointment

Metova, a leading provider of custom software solutions for mobile, web, connected home and car, and Internet of Things (IoT) for the private and public sector and Innovator Health, a leading provider of telehealth and telemedicine solutions, announced the results of a new survey of over 1,000 people in the United States on telemedicine – a technology that's reviving the house call during the COVID-19 pandemic

August 21, 2020 — Metova, a leading provider of custom software solutions for mobile, web, connected home and car, and Internet of Things (IoT) for the private and public sector and Innovator Health, a leading provider of telehealth and telemedicine solutions, announced the results of a new survey of over 1,000 people in the United States on telemedicine – a technology that's reviving the house call during the COVID-19 pandemic. Notably, the survey found, 80%, if given the option, would choose telemedicine for their next medical appointment, 79% have wanted to connect with a medical professional using video conferencing and 93% were either satisfied or very satisfied with their telemedicine experience.

“Eighty-one percent say they would choose telemedicine for their next consultation and 97% say that at least some of their past doctors visits could have been done virtually. It’s clear that the majority is ready for Telemedcine – if they aren’t already using it,” said Jonathan Sasse, president at Metova. "With many wishing to avoid medical waiting rooms due to COVID-19, we’re expecting an acceleration in demand for telemedicine. Fortunately, technology now provides the means to provide patients with no-compromise personal consultations, all from the comfort and safety of the patients home.”

“The demand, acceptance and necessity for telemedicine is here now, but there are still reservations that a telemedicine encounter may be inferior to an in-person visit,” said Darren Sommer, D.O., founder and CEO at Innovator Health. “With new technology solutions, medical providers can deliver high-impact services that are equal to, if not better than, traditional in-person visits - leveraging technology to revive the house call, at a time when we most need it.”

Metova’s July 2020 telemedicine survey concluded:

  • 81% would choose telemedicine for their next consultation If given the option
  • 79% have wanted to connect with a medical professional using video conferencing
  • 96% would find it useful if their doctor or insurance company provided medical equipment to ensure a more productive telemedicine appointment. (i.e. blood pressure, temperature, etc., to provide vital readings during the session)
  • 97% say that at least some of their past doctors visits could have been done virtually
  • 65% say that most (47%) or all (17%) of their past doctors visits could have been done virtually
  • Almost two-thirds feel telemedicine is better then in-person visits for the same type of medical appointments (only 13% think it is worse)
  • Over 80%, if given the option, would choose telemedicine for their next medical appointment
  • Nearly 70% have had a video consultation with a medical professional and nearly 40% of those had their first telemedicine experience since the COVID-19 pandemic began

For more information: www.metova.com

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