Technology | Treatment Planning | February 22, 2018

Mirada Medical Releases DLCExpert for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

Artificial intelligence-based software automates CT contouring for treatment planning

Mirada Medical Releases DLCExpert for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

February 22, 2018 — U.K.-based medical imaging software provider Mirada Medical has released DLCExpert, the first commercially available software for automatic contouring of computed tomography (CT) scans based on next-generation Deep Learning Contouring (DLC).

DLCExpert is Mirada’s first artificial intelligence (AI)-based clinical application. It is intended to automate the time-consuming clinical task of contouring for treatment planning and bring quality and consistency to this process. The software will reduce the time from initial patient consult to start of treatment. High-quality and consistently defined structures will allow more confidence when delivering treatment plans.

Unlike prior algorithms, DLCExpert delivers consistently high-quality structures that have been evaluated as acceptable for clinical use by leading experts in radiation oncology, according to the company. Utilizing Mirada’s advanced deep learning algorithms, the software uses models that have been trained using image data from prominent academic institutions to automatically generate structures for treatment planning.

For more information: www.mirada-medical.com

 

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