News | Lung Cancer | October 05, 2015

Lung Cancer Survival Rates Improve with CT Scan Follow-up

Four-year post-treatment survival jumped 25 percent among patients who relapsed within 24 months

lung cancer survival rates, CT scan follow-up, computed tomography, improvement, ERS International Congress 2015

October 5, 2015 — Patients with recurrent lung cancer have better post-surgery survival rates if their management includes a follow-up program based on computer tomography (CT) of the chest, according to new findings.

The findings, presented at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2015 in Amsterdam, are the first to show improved overall survival after surgery for a CT-based follow-up program and could change the way patients are currently managed.

Previous research has confirmed that after the introduction of the CT-based follow-up, most cases of recurrent lung cancer can be detected before the patient has any symptoms. This allows for earlier diagnosis and leads to an improved chance of having a radical treatment against the relapse. This new study aimed to assess whether this follow-up also improved survival rates.

Researchers from the Odense University Hospital in Denmark assessed 391 patients who had surgery following a lung cancer diagnosis between 2008 and 2013. After the introduction of a CT- based follow-up in July 2010, all patients receives a scan every third month for two years and then every six months for three years. In May 2015, researchers recorded whether the patients were alive and free from lung cancer.

Results showed the number of patients alive four years after surgery increased from 54 percent to an estimated 68 percent. Additionally, for patients experiencing a relapse during the first 24 months after surgery, the chance of being alive four years after the first treatment increased from 2 percent to an estimated 27 percent.

Niels-Christian Hansen, M.D., presenting author on the study, commented: "Our results show a significant improvement for survival rates for patients post-surgery in a CT follow-up program currently running in Denmark. A key strength of our study is the real-life setting we used, where we were able to demonstrate successful results in a representative sample of lung cancer patients from Denmark. This is very encouraging news and we believe that our results could contribute to the planning of similar treatment programs in other centers and countries."

The authors plan to repeat the same kind of analysis for the group of lung cancer patients treated by radiation with the aim to cure, instead of by surgery, to see if the results are also successful for this group of patients.

The Danish Lung Cancer Group has funded a first preliminary report (in Danish) in November 2014. No other external funding has taken place.

For more information: www.erscongress.org

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