News | Digital Radiography (DR) | April 24, 2019

Konica Minolta KDR AU and KDR Primary DR Systems Receive Seismic Certification

Digital radiography systems meet standards for California’s Hospital Facilities Seismic Safety Act

Konica Minolta KDR AU and KDR Primary DR Systems Receive Seismic Certification

April 24, 2019 — Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc., announced its KDR Advanced U-Arm and KDR Primary Digital Radiography System have been certified in California to withstand earthquakes, as part of the state’s Hospital Facilities Seismic Safety Act. The certification provided by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) was awarded after both systems underwent and passed rigorous testing, including a shake test. With the OSHPD Seismic Certification, the KDR AU and KDR Primary can now be installed in any facility that requires this type of certification.

Both systems and components underwent a series of tests before and after a simulated earthquake in accordance with ICC-ES AC156, the acceptance criteria for seismic certification by the International Code Council. The imaging systems, collimators, generators, bucky stand and workstations were all evaluated and found to maintain structural integrity and remain fully functional. Testing was conducted by a third party that specializes in seismic certifications.

The Hospital Seismic Safety Act, part of the California Health and Safety Code, was enacted in September 1994 and established a seismic safety building standards program under OSHPD’s jurisdiction for all hospitals built in California after March 7, 1973. California State law requires all general acute care hospitals to be rated as structural performance category (SPC) 2, 3, 4 or 5 by 2020 and SPC 3, 4 or 5 by 2030. The certificate for Konica Minolta Healthcare KDR can be found on the OSHPD website.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

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