News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 09, 2017

Johns Hopkins Researchers, Carestream Give Presentations on Medical Imaging Advances at RSNA

Presentations will explore advanced techniques and applications in X-ray, CT and MRI

Johns Hopkins Researchers, Carestream Give Presentations on Medical Imaging Advances at RSNA

November 9, 2017 — Researchers from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Carestream Health scientists will participate in scientific presentations that showcase advances in medical imaging at the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) conference, Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

All RSNA 2017 presentations are available for viewing on the RSNA program web site including these that feature experts from Johns Hopkins and Carestream:

  • “High-resolution extremity cone beam CT [computed tomography] with a CMOS X-ray detector: system design and applications in quantitative assessment of bone health,” on Monday, Nov. 27, from 12:45-1:15 p.m. at Room PH Community, Learning Center. Authors are: Q. Cao, M. Brehler, A. Sisniega, G.K. Thawait, J.W. Stayman, J. Yorkston, S. Demehri, J.H. Siewerdsen and W. Zbijewski.
  • “Effect of flat and curved system geometry on X-ray scatter distribution and selection of antiscatter grids,” on Monday, Nov. 27, from 3:40-3:50 p.m. in Room S403A. Authors are: A. Sisniega, W. Zbijewski, P. Wu, J.W. Stayman, N. Aygun, V. Koliatsos, X. Wang, D.H. Foos and J.H. Siewerdsen.
  • “Evaluation of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis patients using CBCT and MRI [magnetic resonance imaging],” on Monday, Nov. 27, from 3:50-4:00 p.m. in Room E451B. Authors are: G.K. Thawait, W. Zbijewski, A. Martin, S. Demehri, J. Fritz, J. Yorkston, M. Albayda, C. Bingham and J.H. Siewerdsen.
  • “Automatic algorithm for joint morphology measurements in volumetric musculoskeletal imaging,” on Thursday, Nov. 30, from 10:40-10:50 a.m. in Room S403B. Authors are: M. Brehler, G.K. Thawait, Q. Cao, J. Kaplan, J. Ramsay, J. Yorkston, S. Demehri, J.H. Siewerdsen and W. Zbijewski.
  • Scientists from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will present “Effect of motion compensation on the image quality of cone beam CT scans in a musculoskeletal setting,” on Monday, Nov. 27, from 3:10-3:20 p.m. in Room S404AB. Authors are: G.K. Thawait, A. Sisniega, S. Demehri, D. Shakoor, J.W. Stayman, J.H. Siewerdsen and W. Zbijewski.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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