News | Lung Cancer | October 26, 2017

Integration of Smoking Cessation Within CT Lung Cancer Screenings Shows Life-Saving Results

Canadian study finds integrating two programs significantly lowers death rates versus CT screening alone

Integration of Smoking Cessation Within CT Lung Cancer Screenings Shows Life-Saving Results

October 26, 2017 — A study that integrated robust smoking cessation programs into an organized low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening program found that the inclusion of both interventions has the potential to decrease mortality rates while being relatively cost-effective. William Evans, M.D., of McMaster University in Canada presented these findings at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC), Oct. 15-18 in Yokohama, Japan.

Previous studies had shown that LDCT screening for smokers at high-risk of developing lung cancer can reduce lung cancer-specific and overall mortality rates. Based on findings from a retrospective analysis, smoking cessation likely plays a role in this mortality reduction. In light of these developments, Evans and his team decided to undertake their own research in this area.

The researchers used a microsimulation model called OncoSim-LC. OncoSim-LC is led and supported by The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer with model development by Statistics Canada, and is made possible by funding from Health Canada. Using the model, the researchers compared screening without an accompanying cessation program to screening scenarios with cessation interventions, projected over 20 years. Cost-effectiveness was estimated based on a lifetime horizon, health system perspective and 1.5 percent discount rate. Costs were reported in 2016 Canadian dollars.

Analyzing the results from the OncoSim-LC model, the researchers determined that adding a cessation program to an organized LDCT screening program could cost $14,000/quality-adjusted life-years gained, even over multiple attempts at smoking cessation, and result in significantly fewer deaths.

"To achieve the maximal benefits of a LDCT screening program, it is essential to incorporate a robust smoking cessation intervention," said Evans. "In my long career as an oncologist, I have not been able to save any patients from advanced non-small cell lung cancer. I believe that an organized lung screening program can be used to provide teachable moments for heavy smokers and, ultimately, save lives."

Some questions remain concerning how these joint programs would look in practice. More implementation research needs to be conducted in order to determine the exact economic requirements, ensure participant adherence to both types of intervention and analyze other logistical trade-offs. However, these research results are promising and offer hope for more lives to be saved.

For more information: www.wclc2017.iaslc.org

Related Content

NIH Study of Brain Energy Patterns Provides New Insights into Alcohol Effects

NIH scientists present a new method for combining measures of brain activity (left) and glucose consumption (right) to study regional specialization and to better understand the effects of alcohol on the human brain. Image courtesy of Ehsan Shokri-Kojori, Ph.D., of NIAAA.

News | Neuro Imaging | March 22, 2019
March 22, 2019 — Assessing the patterns of energy use and neuronal activity simultaneously in the human brain improve
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
Researchers Use Radiomics to Predict Who Will Benefit from Chemotherapy
News | Radiomics | March 21, 2019
Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will...
Older Biologic Age Linked to Elevated Breast Cancer Risk
News | Women's Health | March 19, 2019
Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person’s age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according...
HeartFlow Analysis Successfully Stratifies Heart Disease Patients at One Year
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | March 19, 2019
Late-breaking results confirm the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis enables...
PET Scans Show Biomarkers Could Spare Some Breast Cancer Patients from Chemotherapy
News | PET Imaging | March 18, 2019
A new study positron emission tomography (PET) scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Non-Contrast MRI Effective in Monitoring MS Patients
News | Neuro Imaging | March 18, 2019
Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach...
Bay Labs Announces New Data on EchoGPS, AutoEF AI Software at ACC.19
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs announced the presentation of two studies assessing performance of the...
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session