News | Clinical Trials | June 09, 2017

IDEAS Study Spurs Related Research to Impact Dementia Care

Coordinated studies will become a powerful tool for the Alzheimer's research community

elderly women_iStock

The milestone Imaging Dementia — Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study is working with government and academic researchers to launch three add-on studies to expand the impact of the core study where more than 18,000 people with cognitive decline but an unclear diagnosis will receive an amyloid PET scan.

Participants in the $100 million IDEAS Study may elect to participate in one or all of the related research studies, which are designed to expand the understanding of the aging brain and provide insight for potential dementia treatments. Similar to the groundbreaking Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), IDEAS and its add-on studies will create a massive database of information and samples that scientists worldwide can access and analyze.

The three add-on studies are:

Amyloid Neuroimaging and Genetics Initiative (ANGI) Study will correlate the clinical information and brain imaging data collected in the IDEAS study with genetic information obtained from more than 3,000 study participants. The goal is to identify genetic factors that contribute to cognitive impairment, dementia and other disorders. Previous research has identified more than 20 genes associated with risk for, or protection against, Alzheimer’s. However, the role of these genes in amyloid deposition has not been well-studied. ANGI represents an unprecedented opportunity to gain greater insights into the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s and other dementias. This study is funded by the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Brain Health Registry (BHR) is an online registry and database for recruiting, screening and monitoring progression of brain diseases. The BHR will collect health, lifestyle and cognitive data from IDEAS participants, which will be correlated with the amyloid PET results from the IDEAS Study. Participants can also invite a caregiver or study partner to join; they can work together as a team to advance brain health research. IDEAS participants can learn more about the brain through newsletters and online resources, and can find out about upcoming opportunities to participate in clinical trials and other research studies. The goals are to improve scientists’ understanding of brain aging, learn more about safe ways to use the Internet for brain health screening, and help speed the discovery of treatments for Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases. This study is funded by the Alzheimer’s Association.

Caregivers' Reactions and Experience: Imaging Dementia — Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (CARE) Study represents a unique opportunity to integrate clinical science with data on how patients and caregivers make decisions about, and cope with, the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s. This project will recruit and survey 3,500 pairs of IDEAS Study participants and their care partners, linking PET scan, clinical report and comprehensive Medicare claims data to survey responses. The goal of the CARE Study will be to estimate the effect of amyloid PET results on how people with Alzheimer’s and care partners plan for the future, including advance care planning and future health care utilization. In addition, the study will investigate the impact of the amyloid PET scan results on the care partner, including burden, depression and their own health care utilization. This study is funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

“We’re very excited by the creation and linking of these important research initiatives,” said James Hendrix, PhD, Alzheimer’s Association Director of Global Science Initiatives. “IDEAS is already a landmark research study, especially for clinicians and imagers. Through these three add-on studies, it now has the potential to become a powerful research tool for the entire Alzheimer’s and dementia research community.”

“Together, the IDEAS Study and the three add-ons have the potential to be the largest, most impactful set of coordinated studies on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias,” Hendrix said. “There is an enormous investment in the IDEAS Study from the public, private and philanthropic communities. Through launching the add-on studies, and linking them all together, we’re leveraging the huge IDEAS Study population to answer even more questions about Alzheimer’s disease, other dementias, their genetic origins and impact.”

The related trials are not covered under Medicare, as is the IDEAS Study, but are free to participants. Some may provide modest compensation. The Alzheimer’s Association is leading the effort to contact interested participants; participating physicians are not required to aid in recruitment for the add-on studies.

 

IDEAS Study – Passing the Half-Way Point

After one year, IDEAS has registered nearly half of its expected 18,488 patient enrollees across 824 study sites. This four-year research effort will determine whether a brain positron emission tomography (PET) scan that detects amyloid plaques, a core feature of Alzheimer’s disease, can improve clinical decision-making and patient outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries. Before brain amyloid PET scans, amyloid plaques could be seen only during autopsies, making it much harder to give living patients a definitive diagnosis.

“We are imaging the brains of living people, many of whom have Alzheimer’s disease, to determine whether they have one of the hallmarks of the disease, amyloid plaque, which in turn will aid in our diagnosis. Doctors and families may make different decisions with a more precise diagnosis,” said Gil D. Rabinovici, MD, of UC San Francisco, who is the IDEAS Study chair. “This will be especially important for people with an unclear Alzheimer’s diagnosis. In many cases, ruling out Alzheimer’s can be as valuable as confirming it.”

While the study is no longer accepting new dementia expert centers, additional physicians at enrolled practices may be added and new PET Centers are also still being accepted at this time.

For more information: www.ideas-study.org/

Related Content

Machine Learning IDs Markers to Help Predict Alzheimer's

Neurologists use structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify changes in brain tissue (both gray and white matter) that are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. The MRI images are analyzed using morphometry and tractography techniques, which detect changes in the shape and dimensions of the brain and in the tissue microstructure, respectively. In this example, the images show the normal brain of an elderly patient. Image courtesy of Jiook Cha.

News | Neuro Imaging | September 20, 2018
New research has shown a combination of two different modes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer-based...
PET Imaging Agent Predicts Brain Tau Pathology, Alzheimer's Diagnosis
News | PET Imaging | September 05, 2018
Eli Lilly and Co. and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc. announced a Phase 3 study of positron emission tomography (PET)...
Check-Cap Announces Interim Results of European Study of C-Scan System Version 3
News | Colonoscopy Systems | September 04, 2018
Check-Cap Ltd. announced the interim results for its post-CE approval study of the C-Scan system Version 3, an...
Brain Iron Levels May Predict Multiple Sclerosis Disabilities
News | Neuro Imaging | August 31, 2018
A new, highly accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple...
Study Finds Multiple Sclerosis Drug Slows Brain Shrinkage

An NIH-funded clinical trial suggested that the anti-inflammatory drug ibudilast may slow brain shrinkage caused by progressive MS. Image courtesy of Robert J. Fox, M.D., Cleveland Clinic.

News | Neuro Imaging | August 30, 2018
August 30, 2018 — Results from a clinical...
Rapid Cardiac MRI Technique May Cut Costs, Boost Care in Developing World
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 29, 2018
A newly developed rapid imaging protocol quickly and cheaply diagnosed heart ailments in patients in Peru, according to...
Brain Study of 62,454 Scans Identifies Drives of Brain Aging
News | SPECT Imaging | August 27, 2018
In the largest known brain imaging study, scientists from five institutions evaluated 62,454 brain single photon...
Abnormal Protein Concentrations Found in Brains of Military Personnel With Suspected CTE

Researchers are using the tracer, which is injected into a patient, then seen with a PET scan, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. In this image, warmer colors indicate a higher concentration of the tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain. Credit UCLA Health.

News | PET Imaging | August 24, 2018
August 24, 2018 — In a small study of
Radiation Therapy Affects Event Recall for Children With Brain Tumors
News | Radiation Therapy | August 24, 2018
Children with certain types of brain tumors who undergo radiation treatment are less likely to recall the specifics of...
MRI Study Differentiates Brains of Doers from Procrastinators
News | Neuro Imaging | August 23, 2018
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed why certain people tend to put tasks off rather than tackling them...