News | Mammography | October 11, 2018

iCAD Announces Positive Clinical Results for Artificial Intelligence Tomosynthesis Technology

Results demonstrate improvements in clinical performance and reading times

iCAD Announces Positive Clinical Results for Artificial Intelligence Tomosynthesis Technology

October 11, 2018 — iCAD Inc. announced positive clinical results of its new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection software, demonstrating significant positive results for clinical performance and workflow efficiency. The findings confirmed that the latest artificial intelligence (AI) software solution to support DBT increased improvements in both reader sensitivity (8 percent on average) and specificity (6.9 percent on average). In addition, when reading tomosynthesis cases with the solution, radiologists’ reading times were reduced by more than half (52.7 percent on average).

“iCAD’s unique technology assists me in detecting more cancers, reassures me of my findings, and helps me concentrate on the essential work of a radiologist. The product reduced my reading time by approximately 50 percent, allowing me to read these cases in nearly the same amount of time as 2-D mammograms. I consider it to be one of the greatest tools in modern radiology,” said Axel Gräwingholt, M.D., Radiologie am Theater, Paderborn, Germany.

iCAD’s high-performance, concurrent read, cancer detection and workflow solution for breast tomosynthesis delivers benefits to both radiologists and their patients. The new technology is trained to detect malignancies and determine the probability of malignant findings, providing radiologists with a “certainty of finding” score for each case and each detected lesion. These scores represent the algorithm’s confidence that the detected soft tissue densities (masses, architectural distortions and asymmetries) and calcifications are malignant.

iCAD’s AI technology is available for use with leading digital breast tomosynthesis systems in Europe. The solution is pending clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The company will showcase its latest innovations in cancer detection at The European Society of Breast Imaging annual meeting, Oct. 11-13 in Athens, Greece.

For more information: www.icadmed.com

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