News | April 07, 2015

Health Canada Greenlights IMRIS Ceiling-Mounted Intraoperative CT Solution

Visius iCT provides high-quality OR imaging with low radiation dose management

IMRIS, Visius iCT, Health Canada, licensing

April 7, 2015 — IMRIS Inc. announced that Visius iCT, its ceiling-mounted intraoperative computed tomography scanner, has received Health Canada licensing allowing for sales and marketing in the country.

Visius iCT provides personalized dose management together with diagnostic-quality imaging during the surgical procedure to assist surgeons in critical decision making. Developed for the neurosurgery and spine surgery markets, the scanner has the 64-slice Siemens Somatom Definition AS scanner as its core technology. Unlike other mobile intraoperative CT systems, the Visius iCT can support complex brain tumor resection and neurovascular procedures.

The scanner effortlessly moves into and out of the operating room during surgery using ceiling-mounted rails to ease workflow. This enables multiple room configurations to meet both clinical requirements and increase utilization without compromising image quality or exam speed. Patient transport and the need for floor-mounted rails used in other systems is eliminated, which opens up valuable OR space and allows unimpeded movement of surgical equipment and simplified infection control.

In addition, Visius iCT features a suite of software applications such as 3-D volume rendering to aid in surgical planning, and dose reduction, which considers each patient's unique characteristics to maximize image quality and minimize dose. The system software allows healthcare practitioners to visualize dosage prior to scan and adjust settings based on the specific clinical need with detailed dosage reports produced after each scan.

For more information: www.imris.com

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