News | Neuro Imaging | October 16, 2019

Guerbet Signs Agreement With Icometrix for Exclusive Distribution of Icobrain

Guerbet will have exclusive distribution rights of Icometrix’s artificial intelligence medical imaging solution for neuro imaging in France, Italy and Brazil

Guerbet Signs Agreement With Icometrix for Exclusive Distribution of Icobrain

October 16, 2019 — Guerbet announced it has signed an exclusive agreement with Icometrix for the distribution in France, Italy and Brazil of icobrain, their software-as-a-service (SaaS) artificial intelligence (AI)-based medical imaging solution.

Icobrain is designed to help radiologists and neurologists diagnose and monitor patients with neurological disorders. The AI software extracts clinically meaningful information from brain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with multiple sclerosis, dementia or brain injury. Icobrain can therefore be used to automate the currently manual process of identifying, marking and quantifying volumes of brain structures identified.

Icobrain has obtained marketing authorizations in numerous countries, including the United States, Europe, Canada, Brazil, Australia, Japan and India. It is already used in more than 100 hospitals and imaging centers across the world, according to Icometrix, as well as in clinical studies from major global pharmaceutical companies.

Guerbet Chief Digital Officer François Nicolas said the agreement will allow more patients with neurological disorders to benefit from the icobrain AI technology while also expanding its own portfolio of augmented intelligence solutions beyond oncology. Icometrix CEO Wim Van Hecke added that the collaboration will allow the company to serve hospitals in France, Italy and Brazil “with the best support.” 

For more information: www.guerbet.com, www.icometrix.com

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