Technology | November 24, 2014

Grayhill Debuts Optically Bonded Touch Panel Technology at RSNA

Viewing screen can recognize up to 10 touch points simultaneously for greater precision

Grayhill, Instinct, touch panel, optically bonded, RSNA 2014

Photo courtesy of Grayhill Inc.

November 24, 2014 — Grayhill will display its new optically bonded Instinct touch panel, capable of recognizing up to 10 touch points simultaneously, at the 2014 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting.

In medical environments, Instinct touch panel devices enable hospital personnel to see more clearly, act more quickly, instinctively and precisely. And they can do it all while focused on the screen without having to look away or reach for knobs and dials. One key to this is the high screen sensor resolution of 4,096 x 4,096.

This enables many more distinct touch points in close proximity, which allows an operator to make full use of high-resolution displays and to control image manipulation at a very minute level. This is true whether or not the user is wearing gloves; the Instinct touch panel instantly recognizes and adjusts. Likewise, it can tell when gels or other fluids accumulate on the surface; it shifts into Fluid Compatibility Mode and continues to track individual touch points.

The controller can also ignore the cacophony of “electrical noise” typically found in hospital operating and imaging rooms, without disrupting its operation. It avoids adding to the noise, too, meeting industry standard requirements for Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC).

The optical bonding feature is achieved in-house under stringent controls. A clear liquid adhesive layer is applied to initially bond the touch sensor to a protective glass cover.  The process can then be repeated, bonding the Instinct touch panel to an LCD.

The result is an airtight seal, with no gaps or air pockets to reflect light and no entrance for dust, moisture or bacteria. And the impact-resistant glass can easily be washed/wiped down and disinfected.

For more information: www.grayhill.com

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