Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | December 15, 2015

GE Highlights Expanding Revolution CT Family at RSNA 2015

Company’s newest CT scanners focus on high image quality, advanced applications and low-dose protocols

GE Healthcare, Revolution CT family, EVO, RSNA 2015

The Revolution HD expands CT’̈s utility beyond simple anatomy towards tissue characterization through gemstone spectral imaging.  This image used the ASiR iterative reconstruction to create a chest, abdomen, pelvis exam at only 5.8 mSv.

December 15, 2015 — The Revolution CT, Revolution HD and Revolution EVO CT scanners are now offered with a wider range of capabilities to enable clinicians to have more options in tailored computed tomography (CT) solutions specifically designed to their needs. With a greater variety of options, hospitals will be able to select a CT scanner based on needs like price, performance ranges and software options that best fit their goals and the needs of their patients.

The Revolution CT, Revolution EVO and Revolution HD are each designed to bring unique capabilities to improve the clinical excellence of CT imaging including:

  • Diagnostic confidence of image acquisition;
  • Cutting edge applications with advanced capabilities for more advanced procedures; and
  • Low-dose protocols, including the industry’s first lung cancer screening option for select CT systems.

Revolution CT was designed from the ground up to provide uncompromised image quality and clinical capabilities across all clinical areas through the convergence of whole organ coverage, speed and image quality. This opens the door for clinicians to do more exams, including high heart-rate cardiac, stroke, trauma and pediatric patients.

With a detector inherited directly from the Revolution CT system, Revolution EVO is made for institutions that are unable to sacrifice advanced capabilities such as high resolution for daily productivity. Revolution EVO provides high image resolution, makes low dose routine and helps customers accomplish more in their day. It also provides the flexibility to expand into advanced applications as needs evolve.

GE Healthcare and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (UW) have developed validated protocols, known as UW protocols, which are available for GE Healthcare CT systems (Optima CT 660, Discovery CT750 HD, Revolution HD and Revolution GSI). The protocols were designed and optimized for multiple, very specific clinical applications, such as body imaging, pediatric imaging and cardiovascular imaging. Within each clinical application, the UW team developed and tested multiple versions for patients of different sizes ranging from small children to large adults. UW Protocols can help hospitals potentially save up to $867,000 a year.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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