News | March 30, 2009

GE, Archimedes to Collaborate on Coronary Heart Disease Screening Study

March 30, 2009 - GE Healthcare and Archimedes Inc., an independent Healthcare Modeling organization, announced at ACC that they will collaborate to launch a new virtual study to identify an enhanced diagnostic protocol for predicting coronary heart disease (CHD).

The virtual study applies a sophisticated computer model which simulates diagnostic methods for screening and predicting heart disease to help researchers better understand earlier treatments for the number one killer among men and women in the U.S.

Claudio Marelli, M.D., F.A.C.C., strategic medical leader for GE Healthcare said, “The Framingham score fails to predict 25 percent of coronary artery disease. Unconditional treatment might expose patients to unbeneficial treatments. Our collaboration with Archimedes will shed light on the cost-benefit of screening strategies for CHD - and on the value of imaging - to increase current risk stratification capacities to adjust the intensity of treatment accordingly.”

Despite recent progress in the screening and prevention of CHD, many people continue to be improperly identified through current risk measurement tools such as the Framingham Risk Score. The collaboration will allow for the evaluation of screening strategies to determine the potential of an improved model for calculating the risk of CHD based on new technologies and risk factors.

“Leading innovators like GE Healthcare are embracing healthcare modeling,” said Barbara Peskin, principal investigator for Archimedes. “We are delighted to partner with GE Healthcare in its commitment to investigating preventive health through the use of the Archimedes Model.”

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com and www.archimedes.com

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