News | Quality Assurance (QA) | September 23, 2015

Gammex Introduces CT Perfusion Phantom

Device mimics brain tissue perfusion study to determine blood flow rate curves

Gammex, CT Perfusion Phantom, RSNA 2015, computed tomography

CT Perfusion Phantom image courtesy of Gammex Inc.

September 23, 2015 — The Gammex CT (computed tomography) Perfusion Phantom is designed to mimic a perfusion study where traceable material is monitored as it travels through brain tissue. Software that is proprietary to the CT scanner is then used to determine blood flow rate curves and to compare them to known normals. This provides a reference baseline.

The proprietary rods and vessels are designed to mimic brain tissue, but are interchangeable with ones available in the future. The battery-operated phantom has a delay built into the circuitry allowing the user to set the phantom up and move out of the scanner room to the control.

Other benefits include:

  • Fast set-up
  • Stable reference for perfusion studies provided
  • Upgrade with additional tissue samples as they are released to expand utility of the system
  • Battery powered so there are no electrical cords to deal with
  • Start-up delay allows the user to start the phantom, leave the room and begin the scan, removing uncertainty of when to begin the scanner
  • Highly reproducible
  • Economical

For more information: www.gammex.com

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