News | PET Imaging | June 07, 2021

This is the first treatment for Alzheimer's cleared by the FDA and it is directly related to the development of of the PET imaging tracers to image the disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (#FDA) approved #Aduhelm (#aducanumab) for the treatment of #Alzheimer’s, a debilitating disease affecting 6.2 million Americans. Aduhelm was approved using the accelerated approval pathway, which can be used for a drug for a serious or life-threatening illness that provides a meaningful therapeutic advantage over existing treatments.

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June 7, 2021 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Aduhelm (aducanumab) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s, a debilitating disease affecting 6.2 million Americans. Aduhelm was approved using the accelerated approval pathway, which can be used for a drug for a serious or life-threatening illness that provides a meaningful therapeutic advantage over existing treatments. Accelerated approval can be based on the drug’s effect on a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit to patients, with a required post-approval trial to verify that the drug provides the expected clinical benefit. 

“Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating illness that can have a profound impact on the lives of people diagnosed with the disease as well as their loved ones,” said Patrizia Cavazzoni, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Currently available therapies only treat symptoms of the disease; this treatment option is the first therapy to target and affect the underlying disease process of Alzheimer’s. As we have learned from the fight against cancer, the accelerated approval pathway can bring therapies to patients faster while spurring more research and innovation.”

Alzheimer’s is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, and eventually, the ability to carry out simple tasks. While the specific causes of Alzheimer’s disease are not fully known, it is characterized by changes in the brain—including amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary, or tau, tangles—that result in loss of neurons and their connections. These changes affect a person’s ability to remember and think.

Aduhelm represents a first-of-its-kind treatment approved for Alzheimer’s disease. It is the first new treatment approved for Alzheimer’s since 2003 and is the first therapy that targets the fundamental pathophysiology of the disease.

Researchers evaluated Aduhelm’s efficacy in three separate studies representing a total of 3,482 patients. The studies consisted of double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled dose-ranging studies in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Patients receiving the treatment had significant dose-and time-dependent reduction of amyloid beta plaque, while patients in the control arm of the studies had no reduction of amyloid beta plaque.

These results support the accelerated approval of Aduhelm, which is based on the surrogate endpoint of reduction of amyloid beta plaque in the brain—a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid beta plaque was quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to estimate the brain levels of amyloid beta plaque in a composite of brain regions expected to be widely affected by Alzheimer’s disease pathology compared to a brain region expected to be spared of such pathology. 

The prescribing information for Aduhelm includes a warning for amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA), which most commonly presents as temporary swelling in areas of the brain that usually resolves over time and does not cause symptoms, though some people may have symptoms such as headache, confusion, dizziness, vision changes, or nausea. Another warning for Aduhelm is for a risk of hypersensitivity reactions, including angioedema and urticaria. The most common side effects of Aduhelm were ARIA, headache, fall, diarrhea, and confusion/delirium/altered mental status/disorientation.  

Under the accelerated approval provisions, which provide patients suffering from the disease earlier access to the treatment, the FDA is requiring the company, Biogen, to conduct a new randomized, controlled clinical trial to verify the drug’s clinical benefit. If the trial fails to verify clinical benefit, the FDA may initiate proceedings to withdraw approval of the drug.

Aduhelm was granted Fast Track designation, which seeks to expedite the development and review of drugs that are intended to treat serious conditions where initial evidence showed the potential to address an unmet medical need. 

The FDA’s ruling comes after controversial results from clinical trials. In two phase III clinical trials, only one trial met the primary endpoint of the study: a reduction in clinical decline. However, both studies showed a significant decrease of beta amyloid plaques, which points to a probable reduction in clinical decline in the future.

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is excited about the opportunity for nuclear medicine to support this new drug with precise diagnoses and efficacy of the treatment.  “The approval of Aduhelm is a great win for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and their families. In this scenario, the potential benefits of the drug certainly outweigh the risks.” said SNMMI President Alan Packard, Ph.D., in a written statement. “We are proud that nuclear medicine can help to support this drug by providing definitive diagnoses and monitoring the effectiveness of the treatment.”

More than six million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, a number that is expected to grow as the population ages. It is the sixth leading cause of death among adults in the United States.

Aduhelm is manufactured by Biogen and Eisai Co., Ltd. The companies plan to distribute the drug globally.

For more information: www.fda.gov
 

Related Alzheimers' content:

VIDEO: Researchers Use MRI to Predict Alzheimer's Disease

Brain Iron Accumulation Linked to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Patients

Good Results for Alzheimer’s Imaging Agent

NIH Augments Large Scale Study of Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarkers

Alzheimer’s Association Launches New Website for IDEAS Study

PET Tracer Gauges Effectiveness of Promising Alzheimer's Treatment

 

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