News | January 23, 2014

Embolizing Enlarged Prostates May Alleviate Symptoms

January 23, 2014 – Men with enlarged prostates can find relief with a non-surgical treatment that shrinks the gland, suggests research done on more than 100 patients and presented at the 26th annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET).
 
Prostate artery embolization (PAE) shrinks the prostate by temporarily blocking blood flow to the arteries that feed it. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) affects most men as they age, including more than half by age 60 and 90 percent by age 85. BPH typically is treated with surgery or thermal ablation, which can cause side effects such as retrograde ejaculation or urinary incontinence.
 
University of Sao Paolo physicians have treated 120 patients, and 97 percent have reported improvement in symptoms and quality of life. Symptoms leading to re-embolization, surgery or medication therapy recurred in 14 percent of patients, who have been followed between three months and more than five years. 
 
Embolization is used to treat a variety of conditions, such as fibroid tumors and cancer. Physicians embolize by making a tiny incision in an artery in the groin, feeding a catheter to both prostate arteries and injecting fluid filled with microscopic beads, which block the blood vessels. It can be done using local anesthesia.
 
PAE is an experimental treatment in the United States. A study is underway to compare results of PAE to the standard surgical treatment, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), which requires general or spinal anesthesia.
 
For more information: www.iset.ge

Related Content

Maximum-intensity projections, transaxial fusion, and PET images of 18F-PSMA1007 (A-C) and 68Ga-PSMA-11 (D-F) PET/CT scans of 67-y-old patient with GS 8 and PSA 4.9 ng/mL. Marked uptake is seen in urinary bladder and left ureter (arrow) on maximum-intensity projection image of 68Ga-PSMA-11 (D), as opposed to nearly negligible 18F-PSMA-1007 urinary excretion (A). Dominant lesion in left prostatic lobe is evident on both scans (arrowheads). However, second lesion is seen in right lobe only on 18F-PSMA-1007 sc

Maximum-intensity projections, transaxial fusion, and PET images of 18F-PSMA1007 (A-C) and 68Ga-PSMA-11 (D-F) PET/CT scans of 67-y-old patient with GS 8 and PSA 4.9 ng/mL. Marked uptake is seen in urinary bladder and left ureter (arrow) on maximum-intensity projection image of 68Ga-PSMA-11 (D), as opposed to nearly negligible 18F-PSMA-1007 urinary excretion (A). Dominant lesion in left prostatic lobe is evident on both scans (arrowheads). However, second lesion is seen in right lobe only on 18F-PSMA-1007 scan (arrow in C), later verified on pathology as true malignant lesion. Images created by J. Kuten et al., Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

News | Prostate Cancer | May 12, 2020
May 12, 2020 — The novel radiopharmaceutical 18F-PSMA-1007 is both effective and readily available for detecting mali
#gadolinium Guerbet announced that it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to manufacture Dotarem (gadoterate meglumine) injection at its Raleigh, N.C., facility
News | Interventional Radiology | April 21, 2020
April 21, 2020 — Guerbet announced that it received U.S.
A new framework from an international team of experts aims to help protect patients and providers, and conserve protective equipment for frontline healthcare workers #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2
News | Prostate Cancer | March 30, 2020
March 30, 2020 — In the wake of the COVID-19 pan
Age‐standardized, delay‐adjusted overall cancer incidence rates for 2012 through 2016 are illustrated among males and females by racial/ethnic group

Age‐standardized, delay‐adjusted overall cancer incidence rates for 2012 through 2016 are illustrated among males and females by racial/ethnic group. Racial/ethnic groups are mutually exclusive. Data for the non‐Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population are restricted to Indian Health Service Purchased/Referred Care Delivery Area (PRCDA) counties. API indicates Asian/Pacific Islander. Chart courtesy of ACS Journals 

News | Radiation Oncology | March 16, 2020
March 16, 2020 — The Ann...
M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers

M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers. (c) University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center

News | Prostate Cancer | March 05, 2020
March 5, 2020 — Using a combination of...
SIR President Laura Findeiss, M.D., FSIR

SIR President Laura Findeiss, M.D., FSIR

News | Interventional Radiology | February 09, 2020
February 9, 2020 — For some patients, kidney cancer can be effectively treated without surgery, according to the...
DSA image obtained approximately 24 hours after 1 mg/h IA tPA infusion, 500 U/h heparin via peripheral IV, and daily oral aspirin (81 mg) shows improved perfusion of digital arteries, albeit with suboptimal vascular blush of distal second and third phalanges

DSA image obtained approximately 24 hours after 1 mg/h IA tPA infusion, 500 U/h heparin via peripheral IV, and daily oral aspirin (81 mg) shows improved perfusion of digital arteries, albeit with suboptimal vascular blush of distal second and third phalanges. Photo courtesy of ARRS

News | Interventional Radiology | February 07, 2020
February 7, 2020 — An ahead-of-print...
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Tampere University in Finland have developed a method based on artificial intelligence (AI) for histopathological diagnosis and grading of prostate cancer

From left: Peter Ström, Martin Eklund, Kimmo Kartasalo, Henrik Olsson och Lars Egevad, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Photo courtesy of Stefan Zimmerman

News | Prostate Cancer | January 20, 2020
January 20, 2020 — Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and...
Trends in Overall Cancer Mortality Rates by Sex, United States, 1930 to 2017. Rates are age adjusted to the 2000 US standard population

Trends in Overall Cancer Mortality Rates by Sex, United States, 1930 to 2017. Rates are age adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Chart courtesy of the American Cancer Society

News | Radiation Oncology | January 13, 2020
January 13, 2020 — The cancer death rate declined