News | August 01, 2014

Deadline for ICD-10 Allows Healthcare Industry Ample Time to Prepare for Change

Deadline set for Oct. 1, 2015

August 1, 2014 — The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a rule today finalizing Oct. 1, 2015, as the new compliance date for healthcare providers, health plans, and healthcare clearinghouses to transition to ICD-10, the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases. This deadline allows providers, insurance companies and others in the healthcare industry time to ramp up their operations to ensure their systems and business processes are ready to go on Oct. 1, 2015.

The ICD-10 codes on a claim are used to classify diagnoses and procedures on claims submitted to Medicare and private insurance payers. By enabling more detailed patient history coding, ICD-10 can help to better coordinate a patient’s care across providers and over time. ICD-10 improves quality measurement and reporting, facilitates the detection and prevention of fraud, waste and abuse, and leads to greater accuracy of reimbursement for medical services. The code set’s granularity will improve data capture and analytics of public health surveillance and reporting, national quality reporting, research and data analysis, and provide detailed data to enhance healthcare delivery. Healthcare providers and specialty groups in the United States provided extensive input into the development of ICD-10, which includes more detailed codes for the conditions they treat and reflects advances in medicine and medical technology.

“ICD-10 codes will provide better support for patient care, and improve disease management, quality measurement and analytics,” said Marilyn Tavenner, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). “For patients under the care of multiple providers, ICD-10 can help promote care coordination.”

Using ICD-10, doctors can capture much more information, meaning they can better understand important details about the patient’s health than with ICD-9-CM. Moreover, the level of detail that is provided for by ICD-10 means researchers and public health officials can better track diseases and health outcomes. ICD-10 reflects improved diagnosis of chronic illness and identifies underlying causes, complications of disease and conditions that contribute to the complexity of a disease. Additionally, ICD-10 captures the severity and stage of diseases such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes and asthma.

The previous revision, ICD-9-CM, contains outdated, obsolete terms that are inconsistent with current medical practice, new technology and preventive services.

Much of the industry has already invested resources toward the implementation of ICD-10. CMS has implemented a comprehensive testing approach, including end-to-end testing in 2015, to help ensure providers are ready. While many providers, including physicians, hospitals, and health plans, have completed the necessary system changes to transition to ICD-10, the time offered by Congress and this rule ensure all providers are ready.

For additional information: www.cms.gov/ICD10

Related Content

Partners HealthCare Chooses Visage 7 for Enterprise Imaging
News | Enterprise Imaging | January 18, 2019
Visage Imaging Inc. announced the signing of Partners HealthCare, the largest health system in Massachusetts, for...
Seamless Interoperability – Fact or Fiction? This webinar will show how Nemours Children’s Health System adoption of ScImage’s PICOM365 Enterprise PACS  improved workflow. The product will be highlighted at HIMSS 2019.
Sponsored Content | Webinar | PACS | January 17, 2019
This ScImage-sponsored ITN/DAIC webinar will be held at 2 p.m. Eastern time, Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019.
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Partners With Philips for Health IT and Clinical Informatics
News | Enterprise Imaging | January 16, 2019
Philips announced that NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has chosen to implement the company’s IntelliSpace Enterprise...
AI Approach Outperformed Human Experts in Identifying Cervical Precancer
News | Digital Pathology | January 10, 2019
January 10, 2019 — A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has de
Artificial intelligence, also called deep learning and machine learning, was the hottest topic at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)) meeting.

Artificial intelligence was the hottest topic at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)) meeting, which included a large area with its own presentation therater set asside for AI vendors.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | January 10, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Hands down, the hottest topic in radiology the past two years has been the implementation of...
Pacific Northwest VA Network Selects Carestream as Enterprise PACS Supplier
News | PACS | January 08, 2019
Carestream has been awarded a multimillion-dollar healthcare information technology (IT) contract for Veterans Affairs...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Flat Panel Displays | December 25, 2018
EIZO, which means image in Japanese, is a visual technology company that develops and manufactures high-end display s
Videos | Artificial Intelligence | December 21, 2018
Enhao Gong, Ph.D., founder of Subtle Medical, an artificial intelligence (AI) company that develops products to help
IMS Announces Integration of Cloud Image Viewing Platform With Google Cloud
News | Archive Cloud Storage | December 20, 2018
International Medical Solutions (IMS) recently announced it will provide Google Cloud account users with the ability to...