News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 18, 2020

COVID-19 Infection Control, Radiographer Protection in CT Exam Areas

Radiologists from Shanghai discuss modifying exam process and disinfecting exam room, while outlining personal protection measures during the coronavirus disease outbreak

Radiologists from Shanghai discuss modifying exam process and disinfecting exam room, while outlining personal protection measures during the coronavirus disease outbreak

(HIS = hospital information system, RIS = radiology information system) Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

May 18, 2020 — In an open-access article published ahead-of-print by the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a team of Chinese radiologists discussed modifications to the computed tomography (CT) examination process and strict disinfection of examination rooms, while outlining personal protection measures for radiographers during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

As Jieming Qu, Wenjie Yang, and colleagues at Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical School Affiliated Ruijin Hospital noted, to undergo CT, patients must exit the fever clinic and proceed to an examination room elsewhere at the institution. Moreover, CT examination rooms are not designed according to the rule of three zones and two aisles — clean zone, semicontaminated zone, contaminated zone; patient aisle and health care worker aisle.

"We were able to urgently install a CT scanner in the fever clinic at the beginning of the outbreak, which allowed rapid screening and early diagnosis," Qu et al. wrote. A safe infection control strategy for examination of patients with suspected SARS-CoV-2 was also implemented, including reconstructing the area and planning the path a patient would take. Additionally, Qu, Yang, and team rerouted the walking pathway to be one-way, limiting ingress and egress while separating contaminated zones from clean zones.

Qu, Yang, and colleagues' extensive routine for examination room disinfection included using an air disinfector (maximum volume of 4000 m3/h) and a movable ultraviolet light (intensity higher than 70 μW/cm2 per meter); cleaning nonplastic equipment surfaces, radiation protection items, and doorknobs with a solution at least 75% alcohol; washing plastic surfaces with soapy solution; and mopping the floor with a disinfectant containing 2000 mg Cl per liter of water. Similarly, all patient waste was considered infectious medical waste and managed accordingly.

Typically, CT scanning is performed by two radiographers. As Qu et al. explained: "The operating radiographer works in the locked control room and controls the scanner (contaminated area). The positioning radiographer works inside and outside the scanning room (contaminated area) and is responsible for communicating with and positioning the patient. The positioning radiographer is not allowed to enter into the control room until the shift ends."

Once a shift is finished, the authors of this AJR article noted that the positioning radiographer is allowed to enter the clean zone only after protective equipment has been properly discarded in the buffer zone.

For more information: www.arrs.org

Related Coronavirus Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Deployment of Health IT in China’s Fight Against the COVID-19 Epidemic

Emerging Technologies Proving Value in Chinese Coronavirus Fight

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

Coronavirus Update from the FDA

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

CT Imaging Features of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Chest CT Findings of Patients Infected With Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia 

Find more related clinical content Coronavirus (COVID-19)

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

ESC Council on Hypertension Says ACE-I and ARBs Do Not Increase COVID-19 Mortality

Related Content

SNMMI's Image of the Year is a detailed depiction of areas of cognitive impairment, neurological symptoms and comparison of impairment over a six-month time frame

Figure 1. A: COVID-19-related spatial covariance pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism overlaid onto an MRI template. Voxels with negative region weights are color-coded in cool colors, and regions with positive region weights in hot colors. B: Association between the expression of COVID-19-related covariance pattern and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score adjusted for years of education. Each dot represents individual patient. C: Results of a statistical parametric mapping analysis. Upper row illustrates regions that show significant increases of normalized FDG uptake in COVID-19 patients at 6-months follow-up compared to the subacute stage (paired t test, p < 0.01, false discovery rate-corrected). Bottom row depicts regions that still show significant decreases of normalized FDG uptake in COVID-19 patients at 6-months follow-up compared to the age-matched control cohort at an exploratory statistical threshold (two-sample t test, p < 0.005). Image Credit: G Blazhenets et al., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center – University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg

News | PET Imaging | June 16, 2021
June 16, 2021 — The effects of COVID-19 on the b
A cardiac MRI of athletes who had COVID-19 is seven times more effective in detecting inflammation of the heart than symptom-based testing, according to a study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine with 12 other Big Ten programs.

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Athletes With Clinical and Subclinical Myocarditis A-D, Athlete A with subclinical possible myocarditis was asymptomatic with normal electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram, and high-sensitivity troponin findings. A, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in basal-mid inferolateral wall in short axis view. B, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in the basal inferolateral wall in short axis view. C, Postcontrast steady state-free precession (SSFP) images showing contrast uptake in the basal-mid inferolateral wall in short axis view. D, LGE in the inferolateral wall in 3-chamber view. E-H, Athlete B with subclinical probable myocarditis was asymptomatic with normal ECG, normal echocardiogram, and elevated high-sensitivity troponin findings. E, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the anteroseptal wall in short axis view. F, LGE in the anteroseptal wall in 3-chamber view. G, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the anteroseptal wall in 3-chamber view. F, Postcontrast SSFP image showing pericardial effusion in short axis view. I-K, Athlete C with clinical myocarditis and chest pain, dyspnea, abnormal ECG, normal echocardiogram, and normal troponin findings. I, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the lateral wall short axis view. J, Postcontrast SSFP images showing contrast uptake in midlateral wall in short axis view. K, LGE in the epicardial midlateral wall in short axis view. L-N, Athlete D with clinical myocarditis, chest pain, abnormal ECG, echocardiogram, and troponin findings. L, T1 mapping showing elevated native T1 in midlateral wall in short axis view. M, T2 mapping showing elevated T2 in the midlateral wall in short axis view. N, LGE in the epicardial midlateral wall in short axis view. IR indicates inferior right view; IRP, inferior, right, posterior view; PLI, posterior, left, inferior view; SL, superior left view; SLA, superior, left, anterior view. Image courtesy of JAMA Cardiol. Published online May 27, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2021.2065

News | Cardiac Imaging | June 15, 2021
June 15, 2021 — A...
Rensselaer algorithm can identify risk of cardiovascular disease using lung cancer scan #CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2021
June 14, 2021 — Heart disease and cancer are the ...
A new imaging technique has the potential to detect neurological disorders — such as Alzheimer's disease — at their earliest stages, enabling physicians to diagnose and treat patients more quickly. Termed super-resolution, the imaging methodology combines position emission tomography (PET) with an external motion tracking device to create highly detailed images of the brain.

Result of the Hoffman brain phantom study. Top row: same PET slice reconstructed with A) 2mm static OSEM, B) 1mm static OSEM, C) proposed SR method and D) corresponding CT slice (note that the CT image can be treated as a high-resolution reference). Middle row: zoom on region of interest for corresponding images. Bottom row: Line profiles for corresponding data. Image created by Y Chemli, et al., Gordon Center for Medical Imaging: Department of Radiology Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

News | PET Imaging | June 14, 2021
June 14, 2021 — A new imaging technique has the potential to detect neurological disorders — such as...
Prediction performance of DL compared to quantitative measures and Kaplan-Meier curves for quartiles of DL. Image created by Singh et al., Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.

Prediction performance of DL compared to quantitative measures and Kaplan-Meier curves for quartiles of DL. Image created by Singh et al., Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.

News | SPECT Imaging | June 14, 2021
June 14, 2021 — An advanced artificial i...
Accuray Incorporated announced the company has received CE Mark certification for its ClearRT helical fan-beam kVCT imaging capability.
News | Radiation Therapy | June 11, 2021
June 11, 2021 — Accuray Incorporated announced the company has received CE Mark certification for its...
The new X-ray scanner can provide detailed information about the internal makeup of rocks, which could be useful for archaeologists studying fossils or miners making decisions about which ore to use in their extraction facilities. Image courtesy of Joel Greenberg, Duke University

The new X-ray scanner can provide detailed information about the internal makeup of rocks, which could be useful for archaeologists studying fossils or miners making decisions about which ore to use in their extraction facilities. Image courtesy of Joel Greenberg, Duke University

News | X-Ray | June 10, 2021
June 10, 2021 — Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a prot
News | PET-CT | June 10, 2021
June 10, 2021 — Bringing the power of...