News | Breast Density | January 09, 2020

Breast Density Notification Laws not Effective for all Women

The study found that DBN laws helped some women understand they had increased breast density, but not that breast density is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer or that dense breasts limit the ability of mammograms to detect cancer

The study found that DBN laws helped some women understand they had increased breast density, but not that breast density is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer or that dense breasts limit the ability of mammograms to detect cancer

January 9, 2020 — A new study suggests that state-mandated notifications on mammogram reports intended to inform women of the health risks related to breast density are not worded effectively.

The study, conducted by researchers at Yale and New York University, found that although dense breast notification (DBN) laws did help some women understand they had increased breast density, those women were not more likely to know that breast density is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer or that dense breasts limit the ability of mammograms to detect cancer. The finding was particularly pronounced for women with a high school education or less.

The study appears in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

"We know that women with less education are less likely to receive high-quality breast cancer screening and treatment," said senior author Cary Gross, M.D., a Yale professor of medicine and member of the Yale Cancer Center. "Our study underscores one potential mechanism for this disparity. Ensuring that notifications are written in simple language may help improve understanding of breast density for all women."

Thirty-eight states have enacted DBN laws. Critics of the laws have raised concerns that they might increase women's anxiety about getting breast cancer. There have also been concerns about the readability of language used in the notifications. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently announced a proposal to extend DBN requirements to all mammogram facilities.

For the new study, researchers surveyed 1,928 women across the country. They found no difference in breast cancer-related anxiety between women in DBN and non-DBN states. Women in DBN states were more likely to know if they have increased breast density, but only when those women had higher than a high school level of education.

"The goal for these state laws is not being met," said NYU's Kelly Kyanko, M.D., first author of the study. "Women who lived in states with DBN laws were not more likely to understand the implications of breast density — that having dense breasts meant they were at increased risk of breast cancer or that the radiologist would have a harder time seeing a cancer on their mammogram."

For more information: www.yale.edu

Related Content

Sponsored Content | Videos | Mammography | January 24, 2020
Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed...
Virtual reality during chemotherapy has been shown to improve breast cancer patients’ quality of life during the most stressful treatments
News | Virtual and Augmented Reality | January 21, 2020
January 21, 2020 — Virtual reality during chemotherapy has been shown to improve...
This is a lung X-ray reviewed automatically by artificial intelligence (AI) to identify a collapsed lung (pneumothorax) in the color coded area. This AI app from Lunit is awaiting final FDA review and in planned to be integrated into several vendors' mobile digital radiography (DR) systems. Fujifilm showed this software integrated as a work-in-progress into its mobile X-ray system at RSNA 2019. GE Healthcare has its own version of this software for its mobile r=ray systems that gained FDA in 2019.   #RSNA #

This is a lung X-ray reviewed automatically by artificial intelligence (AI) to identify a collapsed lung (pneumothorax) in the color coded area. This AI app from Lunit is awaiting final FDA review and in planned to be integrated into several vendors' mobile digital radiography (DR) systems. Fujifilm showed this software integrated as a work-in-progress into its mobile X-ray system at RSNA 2019. GE Healthcare has its own version of this software for its mobile r=ray systems that gained FDA in 2019.

Feature | RSNA | January 20, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here are images of some of the newest new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the ...
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Tampere University in Finland have developed a method based on artificial intelligence (AI) for histopathological diagnosis and grading of prostate cancer

From left: Peter Ström, Martin Eklund, Kimmo Kartasalo, Henrik Olsson och Lars Egevad, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Photo courtesy of Stefan Zimmerman

News | Prostate Cancer | January 20, 2020
January 20, 2020 — Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and...
Professor Samer Ezziddin, M.D., from Saarland University/Saarland University Hospital.

Professor Samer Ezziddin, M.D., from Saarland University/Saarland University Hospital. Image courtesy of Saarland University/Thorsten Mohr

 

News | Prostate Cancer | January 13, 2020
January 13, 2020 — When a non-scientist tries to imagine a scientist, the image that often arises is one of a somewha
Sponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | January 03, 2020
At RSNA19, David Widmann, president and CEO of Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas, discussed innovation, stressing th
prostate cancer UCL study
News | Prostate Cancer | January 03, 2020
January 3, 2020 — Nearly one in six deaths from...