News | July 30, 2014

ACR Releases Statement on Cancer Study Regarding Patient Anxiety from CT Lung Cancer Screening

 Lung 4_normal_CT_w permission of SGC employee

July 30, 2014 — Anxiety regarding inconclusive cancer screening test results among some patients is real and is only natural. However, as evidenced by Gareen et al, published July 25 in Cancer, the incidence and effects of anxiety associated with false positive or other results of computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening exams are far less than claimed by some in the medical community.

“Unsubstantiated claims of systemic and harmful patient anxiety should now be put to rest and not continue to delay implementation of CT lung cancer screening programs or Medicare coverage for these tests. It is clear that the lifesaving benefit of these exams in high-risk patients far outweighs any downside,” said Ella A. Kazerooni, M.D., chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Lung Screening Committee.

Gareen et al found that patients who had an abnormal finding on a lung cancer screening test did not experience more anxiety or reduced quality of life than those who were screened and found to be cancer-free. Imaging experts (researchers and clinicians) and allied professionals continue to work to reduce the number of false-positive exams that patients experience and ensure that follow-up exams are as minimally invasive as possible. Physicians also continue to refine the reporting process to ensure that patients receive results as quickly as possible.

Primary National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) results showed that screening high-risk patients for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans significantly reduced lung cancer deaths. The test is at least as cost-effective as other major cancer screening programs and even automobile seatbelts and airbags. In December 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended annual CT lung cancer screening for high-risk patients. Under the Affordable Care Act, private insurers are required to begin covering this service starting Jan. 1, 2015. However, Medicare is not required to follow USPSTF recommendations. CMS will make its final coverage decision in February 2015.

Significant lung cancer screening infrastructure continues to grow. The college created the ACR Lung Cancer Screening Center program, to help certify that these lifesaving exams are provided in a safe, effective manner. The ACR also launched the first edition of Lung-RADS, a quality assurance tool designed to standardize lung cancer screening CT reporting and management recommendations, reduce confusion in lung cancer screening CT interpretations and facilitate outcome monitoring.

“For the first time, we can save thousands of people each year from the nation’s leading cancer killer. Medicare coverage of these lifesaving exams would provide seniors with ready access to this care and help the medical community save lives,” said Kazerooni.

For more information: www.acr.org

Related Content

Third FDA Clearance Announced for Zebra-Med's AI Solution for Brain Bleed Alerts
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 19, 2019
Zebra Medical Vision announced it has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for...
LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the presentation of two studies assessing the performance and accuracy of the company's...
New Data Demonstrates Safety Profile of GammaTile Therapy for Various Brain Tumors
News | Brachytherapy Systems | June 18, 2019
GT Medical Technologies Inc. announced the presentation of clinical data from a prospective study of GammaTile Therapy...
Canon Medical Receives FDA Clearance for AiCE Reconstruction Technology for CT
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 18, 2019
Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. has received 510(k) clearance on its new deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) image...
Black Men Less Likely to Adopt Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | June 17, 2019
A new study reveals black men are less likely than white men to adopt an active surveillance strategy for their...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
Aidoc Earns FDA Approval for AI for C-spine Fractures
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 11, 2019
Radiology artificial intelligence (AI) provider Aidoc announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared...
SCCT Announces 2019 Gold Medal Award Recipients
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 05, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) will present the 2019 Gold Medal Award to Jonathon Leipsic, M....
SIIM and ACR Host Machine Learning Challenge for Pneumothorax Detection and Localization
News | Artificial Intelligence | June 03, 2019
The Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) are collaborating...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...