News | September 09, 2009

ACR to Develop LI-RADS to Collect CT, MR Data for HCC

MR of a liver. American Radiology Services.

September 9, 2009 - The ACR has convened a LI-RADS (Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System) Committee to develop a system for standardized reporting and data collection for CT and MR imaging surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

The production of CT-MR LI-RADS aims to do the following:
1. reduce the frequency of technically inadequate examinations by specifying minimum acceptable technical parameters for CT and MR surveillance imaging procedures;
2. improve communication with clinicians, reduce variability in lesion interpretation, and facilitate meta-analysis of published manuscripts by creating a lexicon of controlled CT and MR terminology;
3. reduce omissions of relevant information from CT and MR reports by standardizing report content and structure, and;
4. facilitate outcome monitoring, performance auditing, quality assurance, and research by producing a formal data collection system.

“There currently is no formal data collection system, limiting the ability to amass large image databases, share data among institutions, perform data mining, monitor outcomes, give feedback, and assure quality. The Committee seeks to address these problems by developing a CT-MR LI-RADS electronic manual to guide the radiology care of patients with or at risk for HCC,” said Claude Sirlin, M.D., chair of the ACR LI-RADS Committee.

LI-RADS is a new method of categorization of liver findings in patients with end stage liver disease. LI-RADS categories will allow radiologists to stratify lesions according to the level of concern for HCC and suggest strategies for follow up and management.

“The purpose of the LI-RADS categories is to allow both community and academic radiologists to use terminology that is consistent between centers throughout the country. LI-RADS categories may be used in the development of imaging guidelines and triage for treatment options,” said Dr. Sirlin.

For more information: www.acr.org

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