Feature | January 29, 2014

Ultrasound Building Utility Outside Cardiology

Cardiac Ultrasound Systems Point-of-Care Cardiology Clinical Study
January 19, 2014 — A paper in the journal of the World Heart Federation, Global Heart, reported mounting evidence of the utility of ultrasound in areas outside its traditional field of cardiology, with increasing use reported in general hospital wards, clinics and pre-hospital environments. The paper is by Associate Professor Bret Nelson and Dr. Amy Sanghvi, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.
 
"The pervasive use of focused ultrasound is perhaps most evident in the advent of ultrasound training in undergraduate medical curricula," the authors said. They refer to a 2011 review paper that highlighted the growing use of point-of-care ultrasound by clinicians in over 20 specialties. "Increased training by clinicians across many specialties, coupled with technology improvements yielding lower cost and better quality studies, have contributed to this trend.”
 
The authors said prognostic value of emergency physician-performed cardiac ultrasound has been demonstrated. Several studies have shown that no cardiac arrest patients without cardiac activity evident on ultrasound survived resuscitation. In general hospital wards and clinics, many studies have addressed the use of point-of-care ultrasound. A clinic-based study of first-year medical students instructed in the use of ultrasound demonstrated they were able to detect pathology in 75 percent of patients with known cardiac disease, where board-certified cardiologists using stethoscopes could detect only 49 percent. Pocket-sized ultrasound devices were used by general practitioners (GPs) in Norway to assess left ventricular function in patients with suspected heart failure. Here, 92 patients were assessed by GPs as well as cardiologists, and the measurements obtained with ultrasound by GPs correlated well with those obtained by cardiologists.
 
In environments where ambulances are staffed by physicians, Breitkreutz et al assessed patients in cardiac arrest as well as those receiving peri-arrest care. The FEEL (Focused Echocardiography Evaluation in Life Support) study demonstrated cardiac ultrasound changed management in 89 percent of the cardiac arrest patients and 66 percent of peri-arrest patients. The possibility also exists for ambulances to transmit ultrasound images to the in-hospital emergency teams awaiting arrival of incoming patients, with potentially life-saving implications.
 
The authors also refer to examples of ultrasound included in medical education curricula in Germany and the United States. 
 
For more information: www.globalheart-journal.com

Related Content

Technology | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | June 19, 2018
EDAP TMS SA has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Focal One device for...
Epsilon Imaging Demonstrates Strain Imaging Integration for Echo Programs at ASE 2018
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2018
Clinical practice, along with guidelines and research, have shown that speckle tracking strain imaging can improve...
FDA Clears Bay Labs' EchoMD AutoEF Software for AI Echo Analysis
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2018
Cardiovascular imaging artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs announced its EchoMD AutoEF software received 510(...
Hitachi Medical Systems Europe Named Imaging Supplier for London Prostate Cancer Program
News | Prostate Cancer | June 14, 2018
Hitachi Medical Systems Europe has been awarded the contract to supply six ultrasound systems as part of the RAPID...
How AI and Deep Learning Will Enable Cancer Diagnosis Via Ultrasound

The red outline shows the manually segmented boundary of a carcinoma, while the deep learning-predicted boundaries are shown in blue, green and cyan. Copyright 2018 Kumar et al. under Creative Commons Attribution License.

News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 12, 2018 | Tony Kontzer
June 12, 2018 — Viksit Kumar didn’t know his mother had...
Olympus and Hitachi Healthcare Americas Introduce Arietta 850
News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 04, 2018
Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedu
New Ultrasound Guidelines Reliably Identify Children Who Should be Biopsied for Thyroid Cancer

Image courtesy of Loyola Medicine

News | Pediatric Imaging | May 29, 2018
A Loyola Medicine study has found that new ultrasound guidelines can reliably identify pediatric patients who should be...
Samsung Receives FDA Clearance for Premium Ultrasound System RS85
Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | May 07, 2018
NeuroLogica, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., announced the Samsung RS85 ultrasound system has received U....
3D-4D ultrasound of a fetus imaged with a GE Volusion E10 system. It shows the yoke sac. This is a baby ultrasound, also referred to as fetal ultrasound or prenatal ultrasound.

3D-4D ultrasound of a fetus imaged with a GE Volusion E10 system. It shows the yoke sac.

Feature | Ultrasound Women's Health | May 07, 2018
Below is a collection of prenatal ultrasound images from the ITN archive.
Esaote Change of Ownership Completed
News | Ultrasound Imaging | April 30, 2018
The acquisition of biomedical equipment company Esaote SpA’s share capital was completed on April 19, the company...
Overlay Init