Feature | January 21, 2014

IMV Market Report Shows U.S. CT Procedure Volume Dropping

January 21, 2014 — Computed Tomography (CT) procedure rates have declined by an average annual 5.5 percent in the United States over the past two years, diverging from a previous decade-long growth trend, according to a survey conducted by IMV Medical Information Division. 
 
“This apparent decline in CT procedures over the past couple years may in part be due to the reimbursement policies of Medicare and third-party insurers, who have tightened their reimbursements for key CT studies,” said Lorna Young, senior director of market research at IMV.
 
Pressures on CT departments that are impacting procedure rates include reduced reimbursements, necessary prior authorization for imaging studies, upholding department accreditations and national and regional policy reforms. IMV’s survey revealed about two-thirds of CT providers agree “the impact of federal healthcare reform is so uncertain that our facility has slowed the rate of all capital equipment spending until we know what the outcome is.” 
 
Reportedly, independent imaging centers with budgets to balance are more sensitive than hospitals to revenue-diminishing reductions in Medicare payments and third-party reimbursements. 
 
For more information: www.imvinfo.com

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