News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 22, 2020

Using Lung X-rays to Diagnose COVID-19

Medical professionals around the world have been feeding lung X-rays into a database since the beginning of the pandemic

Medical professionals around the world have been feeding lung X-rays into a database since the beginning of the pandemic

Pre-processing results. Image courtesy of Applied Sciences.

Classification results on X-ray images. Image courtesy of Applied Sciences.

July 22, 2020 — Researchers from the Department of Computer Architecture and Technology at the University of Seville's School of Computer Engineering (ETSII) are working on a system that uses X-ray images of patients' lungs to help diagnose COVID-19. This system uses deep learning to train a neural network model that can distinguish between healthy patients, pneumonia patients and COVID-19 patients. This has been achieved using a freely accessible online database that medical professionals from around the world have been feeding with lung X-rays since the onset of the pandemic.

"The spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has turned COVID-19 into a global epidemic. The most commonly-used tests to diagnose the disease are invasive, time-consuming and resource-limited. Images obtained from magnetic resonances and/or X-rays are increasingly being used to facilitate diagnostic assistance tasks, having been successfully tested to identify lung problems. However, these diagnostic methods require a specialist, which limits mass uptake among the population," said University of Seville professor Manuel Jesús Domínguez. The researcher adds that processing tools can help reduce health professionals' workload by filtering out negative cases. In particular, advanced artificial intelligence techniques such as deep learning have proven highly effective in identifying patterns such as those found in diseased tissue.

Similarly, this work analyses the effectiveness of a deep learning model based on a VGG-16 neural network for the identification of pneumonia and COVID-19 using X-rays of the torso. The results, published in the journal Applied Sciences, reveal that this method is around 100% effective in the identification of COVID-19, proving that it can be used as an aid to diagnose this disease.

For more information: www.us.es

Related Coronavirus Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

Cardiac Imaging Best Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic

RSNA Publishes COVID-19 Best Practices for Radiology Departments

ASE Guidelines for the Protection of Echocardiography Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak
New CT Scoring Criteria for Timely Diagnosis, Treatment of Coronavirus Disease

FDA Issues New Policy for Imaging Systems During COVID-19

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging —  Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.

A Review of Studies Cautions Against Chest CT for Coronavirus Diagnosis

New Research Finds Chest X-ray Not Reliable Diagnostic Tool for COVID-19

VIDEO: Radiology Industry Responding to COVID-19

University of Washington Issues Radiology Policies for COVID-19

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

New Research Highlights Blood Clot Dangers of COVID-19

Survey Reveals Most Medical Practices are Now Using Telehealth Due to COVID-19

CMS Offers Recommendations on Reopening Healthcare in Areas of Low COVID-19 Cases

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

Related Content

Indeterminate lesion on PET/CT classified by PET/MRI for 53-y-old man with lung cancer.

Indeterminate lesion on PET/CT classified by PET/MRI for 53-y-old man with lung cancer. Contrast-enhanced CT (A), PET (B), and fused 18F-FDG PET/CT (C) images are displayed in comparison with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (D), PET, and fused 18F-FDG PET/MRI (F) images. In CT (A), hyperdense, subcentimeter liver lesion (arrows) in segment VII is suggestive of transient hepatic attenuation difference or small hemangioma. As malignancy cannot be excluded, it needs further investigation. On PET/MRI, lesion is clearly classified as metastasis because of contrast enhancement and tracer uptake due to later acquisition time point. Follow-up CT confirmed diagnosis after 78 d. Images created by Ole Martin, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty and Benedikt Schaarschmidt, University Hospital Essen.

News | PET-MRI | September 18, 2020
September 18, 2020 — A single-center observational study of more than 1,000 oncological examinations has demonstrated
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every facet of personal life, business operations and healthcare, including breast imaging and breast cancer care.

Getty Images

Feature | Breast Imaging | September 18, 2020 | By Susan Harvey, M.D.
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every facet o
As the silos of data and diagnostic imaging PACS systems are being collapsed and secured, the modular enterprise imaging platform approach is gaining significance, offering systemness and security
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | September 18, 2020 | By Anjum M. Ahmed, M.D., MBBS, MBA, MIS
COVID-19 is now everywhere, and these are the lo
Figure 1. Doppler flows in subpleural consolidation shows smoothly dilated branching arteries

Figure 1. Doppler flows in subpleural consolidation shows smoothly dilated branching arteries 

Feature | Radiology Imaging | September 17, 2020 | By Robert Bard, M.D. PC, DABR, FASLM
COVID-19 is routinely studied using...
Ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release quickly improves hand function and reduces hand discomfort, making the procedure a safe, effective, and less invasive alternative to traditional open or endoscopic surgery

Patients answered three questionnaires (Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [QDASH] and two parts of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire: symptom severity [BCTSQ-SS] and functional status [BCTSQ-FS] scales) assessing the affected wrist's function and discomfort immediately pre-procedure, 2 weeks post-procedure, and at least one year post-procedure. Infographic courtesy of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Ultrasound Imaging | September 17, 2020
September 17, 2020 — According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR),...
Data from latest research presented at the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020 suggests COVID-19 pandemic halts cancer care and damages oncologists' wellbeing

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | September 17, 2020
September 17, 2020 — Delays and cancellation of cancer treatments and other safety measures undertaken to minimize th
News | Artificial Intelligence | September 16, 2020
September 16, 2020 — Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas, Inc.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | September 15, 2020
September 15, 2020 — The world is facing a global pandemic with unknown implications, but it is now well known ...