News | October 14, 2011

U.K. Study Links Source-to-Image Distance, Image Quality

October 14, 2011 — A study published in the September/October issue of Radiologic Technology shows increasing the source-to-image distance for direct digital radiography (DR) pelvic examinations reduces radiation dose while maintaining image quality. RT is a journal of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT).

Researchers from the United Kingdom investigated distance, dose and image quality for DR pelvic exams, the second most common Bucky procedure in the country.

To perform the study, the researchers positioned an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom for a standard anteroposterior examination. Using a single DR unit with a flat panel detector, they set an initial source-to-image distance of 100 cm and used an antiscatter focused radiation grid. The x-ray beam was collimated for a standard AP pelvic examination and was kept constant throughout the experiment, while source-to-image distance varied from 80-147 cm.

Two exposures were taken in 10-cm intervals to determine image quality, and the experiment was repeated without the grid. A total of 80 images were then sent to a reporting-grade picture archiving and communication workstation for image quality analysis. Researchers calculated the entrance surface dose and effective dose based on distances of 60 cm, 80 cm, 100 cm, 120 cm, 140 cm and 147 cm. 

The research results indicate that by increasing the source-to-image distance, both the entrance surface dose and effective dose decreased when using the antiscatter radiation grid; they decreased further when the grid was removed. At 147 cm, the decrease in entrance surface dose and effective dose when using a grid equated to a 25 percent reduction in radiation dose compared with standard parameters. 

“The optimization of radiation dose for both computed radiography and digital radiography examination is an essential part of radiographic practice,” said Andrew England, BSc(Hons), PgCert, MSc, FHEA, a study author and lecturer for the directorate of medical imaging and radiotherapy at the University of Liverpool. “Our lab-based phantom experiments have indicated that dose reduction is possible without loss of any image quality.” 

In addition, the findings suggest that as source-to-image distance increases, there also may be a minor increase in image quality, although it was determined to be statistically insignificant.     

Based on the study’s outcome, researchers recommended a clinical study involving patients is necessary to confirm the dose reduction potential of increasing source-to-image distances. “It is essential that any improvements to radiographic technique are carefully evaluated in a clinical setting as well as in the lab before we can promote the widespread adaption of any new techniques,” England said.

For more information: www.asrt.org

Related Content

Oxipit Introduces Multilingual Support for ChestEye AI Imaging Suite
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 16, 2019
The CE-certified ChestEye artificial intelligence (AI) imaging suite by Oxipit is now available in seven European...
Check-Cap Initiates U.S. Pilot Study of C-Scan for Colorectal Cancer Screening
News | Colonoscopy Systems | April 15, 2019
Check-Cap Ltd. has initiated its U.S. pilot study of the C-Scan system for prevention of colorectal cancer through...
Deep Lens Closes Series A Financing for Digital AI Pathology Platform
News | Digital Pathology | April 09, 2019
Digital pathology company Deep Lens Inc. announced the closing of a $14 million Series A financing that will further...
Enlitic Closes Series B Funding for Artificial Intelligence Solutions for Radiologists
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 08, 2019
Radiology artificial intelligence (AI) company Enlitic announced the close of its $15 million Series B financing round...
Uterine Fibroid Embolization Safer and as Effective as Surgical Treatment
News | Interventional Radiology | April 05, 2019
Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) effectively treats uterine fibroids with fewer post-procedure complications compared...
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
News | Biopsy Systems | March 29, 2019
Dune Medical Devices has just completed the first in-man cases for Smart Biopsy, its percutaneous soft tissue biopsy...
Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Emergency X-ray Identification of Pacemakers
News | X-Ray | March 29, 2019
A research team from Imperial College London believes a new software could speed up the diagnosis and treatment of...
Interventional Radiology Treatment for Tennis Elbow Reduces Pain and Inflammation

Image courtesy of Yuji Okuno

News | Interventional Radiology | March 29, 2019
Tennis elbow, a painful chronic condition that affects up to 3 percent of U.S. adults, can be effectively treated...
NIH Study of Brain Energy Patterns Provides New Insights into Alcohol Effects

NIH scientists present a new method for combining measures of brain activity (left) and glucose consumption (right) to study regional specialization and to better understand the effects of alcohol on the human brain. Image courtesy of Ehsan Shokri-Kojori, Ph.D., of NIAAA.

News | Neuro Imaging | March 22, 2019
March 22, 2019 — Assessing the patterns of energy use and neuronal activity simultaneously in the human brain improve