News | January 04, 2009

Toshiba Earns Frost & Sullivan’s Innovation Award for Cardiovascular Imaging

January 5, 2009 - Frost & Sullivan said it has awarded Toshiba America Medical Systems with its 2008 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for Healthcare Innovation.

Toshiba launched a variety of cardiovascular imaging devices in 2008, including the recently-released Aplio Artida, a cardiac ultrasound. This product has taken echocardiography a step ahead of plain 4D imaging by automating complex measurements (wall motion tracking) made possible by 4D imaging. The company also released its five-axis cardiovascular X-ray system. Toshiba's newest Vantage MR system has reportedly set new standards in contrast-free MR angiography (MRA).

Toshiba also released the Aquilion ONE, a CT system based on a 320-detector architecture, providing high temporal resolution and reportedly offering the industry's widest anatomic area coverage per gantry rotation. It enables robust, dynamic imaging of the entire heart in a single heartbeat and at a much lower radiation dose.

For more information: www.awards.frost.com, www.medical.toshiba.com

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