News | September 30, 2014

Societies Release First Appropriate Use Criteria for Pediatric Heart Disease

Document aims to reduce ‘rarely appropriate’ echocardiograms

Societies Release First Appropriate Use Criteria for Pediatric Heart Disease

September 30, 2014 — The American College of Cardiology (ACC), along with eight partnering societies, released the first appropriate use criteria (AUC) for suspected heart disease in pediatric patients.

The “2014 Appropriate Use Criteria for Initial Transthoracic Echocardiography in Outpatient Pediatric Cardiology” was developed in collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Heart Association (AHA), American Society of Echocardiography (ASE), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) and Society of Pediatric Echocardiography (SOPE).

“The purpose of the new criteria is to improve patient care and outcomes in a cost-effective manner,” said Robert Campbell, M.D., chief of the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Sibley Heart Center, professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine and chair of the writing committee. “This document will also help to improve quality within practices.”

The writing group identified 113 indications for outpatient pediatric echocardiography based on common clinical scenarios and/or clinical practice guidelines. An independent rating panel then evaluated each indication as “Appropriate,” “May Be Appropriate” or “Rarely Appropriate.” Campbell stressed the paper will help to reduce the rate of “Rarely Appropriate” echocardiograms in this patient population.

“The goal is to familiarize both pediatricians and pediatric cardiologists when echocardiography may help a physician elucidate a quicker diagnosis and when other diagnostic pathways may be more useful,” added Campbell. “For example, the writing committee spent a lot of time on the importance of recognizing when an echocardiogram may or may not be needed for a murmur. Much of the determination lies with the auscultation skills of the physician, and the writing committee wanted to encourage pediatricians not to immediately order an echo, especially for innocent sounding murmurs.”

The full paper was published online on the websites of the ACC, ASE and SCAI.

For more information: www.cardiosource.org, www.asecho.org, www.scai.org

Related Content

The Philips AAA Model integrates software and Philips 3-D ultrasound technologies into a single solution to automatically segment and quantify the size of the aneurysm sac for surveillance of known native and post-EVAR treated AAAs.

The Philips AAA Model integrates software and Philips 3-D ultrasound technologies into a single solution to automatically segment and quantify the size of the aneurysm sac for surveillance of known native and post-EVAR treated AAAs.
 

News | Ultrasound Imaging | January 27, 2021
January 27, 2021 — Philips Healthcare has introduced the Philips Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Model, providing phy
MRI Targeted biopsy is performed using cognitive fusion more easily with anatomical guidance based on the radiology report. MRI targets can be identified quickly in real-time along with micro-ultrasound targets, which may have been missed on MRI.

MRI Targeted biopsy is performed using cognitive fusion more easily with anatomical guidance based on the radiology report. MRI targets can be identified quickly in real-time along with micro-ultrasound targets, which may have been missed on MRI. Image courtesy of Exact Imaging

Feature | Prostate Cancer | January 20, 2021 | By Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D.
Historically when a patient had an elevated PSA (prostate specific antigen) test their urologist would take the next
Previously approved by FDA in the USA, MyLab X8 expands the reach of the MyLab Ultrasound Product Line with a fully featured premium imaging solution, integrating the latest technologies and delivering superior image quality without compromising workflow or efficiency.
News | Ultrasound Imaging | January 20, 2021
January 20, 2021 — Esaote North America announces that the...
Myocarditis among recovering COVID-19 athletes less common than previously reported

Getty Images

News | Cardiac Imaging | January 11, 2021
January 11, 2021 — In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's...
Jeff Elias, MD, is a neurosurgeon at UVA Health and a pioneer in the field of focused ultrasound.

Jeff Elias, MD, is a neurosurgeon at UVA Health and a pioneer in the field of focused ultrasound. Image courtesy of UVA Health

News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | January 08, 2021
January 8, 2021 — A scalpel-free alternative to brain surgery has the potential to benefit people with...
Ultromics will offer its artificial intelligence driven EchoGo Pro as a stress-echo module in the EchoGo suite alongside EchoGo Core, its AI solution for automated systolic function and strain analysis. The EchoGo suite is a cloud-based service that uses artificial intelligence to fully automate the pathway to diagnosis, providing near-instant reports for clinicians without any need for physical software on site. #AI #AIhealthcare #AIecho

Ultromics will offer its artificial intelligence driven EchoGo Pro as a stress-echo module in the EchoGo suite alongside EchoGo Core, its AI solution for automated systolic function and strain analysis. The EchoGo suite is a cloud-based service that uses artificial intelligence to fully automate the pathway to diagnosis, providing near-instant reports for clinicians without any need for physical software on site.

News | Artificial Intelligence | January 06, 2021
January 6, 2021 — The U.S.
New software-based application helps clinicians visualize breast anatomy and provides detailed characterization of lesions
News | Breast Imaging | December 17, 2020
December 17, 2020 — Hologic, Inc.
For some, COVID-19 can result in severe pneumonia or even death, while others remain purely asymptomatic. A diagnostic tool could help physicians predict if a patient with COVID-19 will worsen.

Using 14 points in the lungs, researchers looked for abnormalities and assigned each spot a score out of 3 based on its severity. Adding up all the points, they found the total lung ultrasound score was higher for those who had a worsening outcome of COVID-19. Image courtesy of Umberto Sabatini

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 11, 2020
December 11, 2020 — For some, COVID-19 can resul