Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 04, 2017

Siemens Introduces Compressed Sensing Acceleration Technology for Faster MRI Scans

Enables MR imaging up to 10 times faster without compromising image quality

Compressed Sensing MRI, Siemens MRI

At RSNA 2016, Siemens Healthineers unveiled its groundbreaking Compressed Sensing technology, which overcomes a major limitation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): long acquisition times. With Compressed Sensing, MRI scans can be shortened dramatically. For example, cardiac cine imaging with Compressed Sensing can be performed in 16 seconds rather than the traditional four minutes, thanks to an innovative algorithm that reduces the amount of data required.2

 

Only Key Data Points Required

Thanks to Compressed Sensing, fewer data points are needed to provide MR images of diagnostic quality. Iterative reconstruction enables the reconstruction of high-resolution, high-quality images with no information loss. Additionally, the efficient inline reconstruction algorithm of Compressed Sensing enables a high degree of clinical throughput. The acquired data is calculated directly at the MRI scanner, requiring no export or external processing of that data.

In cardiac imaging, Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine takes full advantage of this algorithm. Rather than hold their breath 10 to 14 times, which can take four minutes due to regenerative scan breaks, patients can now breathe freely, and the acquisition time is roughly 16 seconds. Accurate assessment of additional quantitative information such as ejection fraction requires only one breath hold. Motion artifacts caused by breathing and heartbeats are effectively avoided, which benefits older and critically ill patients who cannot hold their breath.

 

MRI for Patients With Cardiac Arrhythmias

The speed of Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine makes cardiac MRI accessible to entirely new patient groups, including those with cardiac arrhythmias. The software is currently 510(k) pending. In the past, cardiac MRI scans were not an option for these patients due to the images’ low diagnostic quality. But thanks to the adaptive triggering of Compressed Sensing, the entire cardiac cycle – including diagnostic information regarding the late diastolic phase – can be recorded in real time with a single breath-hold. Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine also offers excellent visualization and quantification of the left ventricle function, according to scientific studies.

The Compressed Sensing algorithm developed by Siemens Healthineers won acclaim from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) at the 2014 Competition for Dynamic Imaging. Working with research partners, Siemens Healthineers further developed the algorithm and transformed it into a product. For years, selected customers worldwide have been using a work-in-progress (WIP) imaging package for application in research. Compressed Sensing technology has been tried and tested in multiple clinical settings, with numerous studies attesting to its advantages.

For more information: www.siemens.com/healthineers

 

Reference:
1. Kido, et al. Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (2016).

 

Related Content

"Residual Echo" of Ancient Humans May Hold Clues to Mental Disorders

MRI data shows (left) areas of the skull preferentially affected by the amount of Neanderthal-derived DNA and (right) areas of the brain’s visual system in which Neanderthal gene variants influenced cortex folding (red) and gray matter volume (yellow). Image courtesy of Michael Gregory, M.D., NIMH Section on Integrative Neuroimaging

News | Neuro Imaging | July 26, 2017
Researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have produced the first direct evidence that parts of...
Technology | Pediatric Imaging | July 21, 2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device specifically...
Sponsored Content | Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 21, 2017
DAIC and ITN Editor Dave Fornell discusses some of the most innovative new computed tomography (CT) technology and tr
Sponsored Content | Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 19, 2017
Matthew Budoff, M.D., FACC, professor of medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, endowed chair of preventi
Sponsored Content | Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | July 19, 2017
Leslee Shaw, Ph.D., director of clinical research and professor of medicine at Emory University, Atlanta, and past-pr
Synergy Radiology Associates Employs UroNav Fusion Biopsy System for Better Prostate Cancer Diagnosis
News | Biopsy Systems | July 17, 2017
Radiologists from Synergy Radiology Associates (SRA) in Houston are using the power of 3-D medical imaging and...
Low Doses of Radiation Could Harm Cardiovascular Health
News | Radiation Dose Management | July 17, 2017
Ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, has a harmful effect on the cardiovascular system even at doses equivalent to...
CMS Proposes Delaying Clinical Decision Support Documentation to 2019
News | Clinical Decision Support | July 14, 2017 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
In a series of proposed rule changes to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) released July 13, the Centers for...
Overlay Init