News | March 14, 2011

Siemens and CHCA Sign GPO Agreement for Pediatric Imaging

March 14, 2011 – Siemens Healthcare and the Child Health Corporation of America (CHCA) have entered into a group purchasing organization (GPO) agreement. As a result of the agreement, CHCA owners will have greater access to Siemens pediatric-specific medical imaging technologies for their hospitals and pediatric healthcare delivery systems.

Owned by 43 leading children’s hospitals, CHCA represents more than 20,000 physicians and $2 billion in overall product purchases and helps children’s hospitals accelerate the safe, efficient and effective delivery of clinical care.

“We are honored to partner with the Child Health Corporation of America to help provide them with the latest technologies in pediatric imaging,” said Robin Anderson, senior director of national accounts. “This strategic alliance will help CHCA children’s hospitals better help serve their smallest patients with innovations, such as low dose technologies and optimal scanning speed, to enable enhanced patient comfort and maximize throughput.”

The new alliance encompasses all of the company’s pediatric medical imaging technologies.

Systems such as the Somatom Definition Flash computed tomography (CT) scanner, which can cover the entire thorax in less than a second, will be especially helpful. Bringing this scan speed to imaging children eliminates the need for sedation. This shortens prep time, eliminates repeating scans due to motion and reduces risk as well as anxiety. Secondly, the system requires only a fraction of the radiation dose.

Technology designed with children in mind leads to better imaging and better clinical information, which reduces the expense and time of rescheduling patients, improves workflow and satisfaction of staff members. It also offers patients and their families a better experience.

For more information: www.siemens.com/healthcare

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