News | August 17, 2011

SCCT Announces New Leadership

August 17, 2011 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) announced the election of James K. Min, M.D., FSCCT, as its new president and John R. Lesser, M.D., FSCCT, as president-elect of the organization. Jeffrey J. Carr, M.D., FSCCT, is the vice president and Ricardo C. Cury, M.D. is joining the executive committee as treasurer. The announcement was made official at the sixth annual scientific meeting, recently held in Denver, Colo.

Min is associate professor of medicine at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is the director of cardiac imaging research and co-director of cardiac imaging in the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. Min has conducted extensive research over the last decade examining the clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of coronary CT angiography and coronary artery calcium scoring. He has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and abstracts on these topics. In addition to his distinguished research and practice, his leadership experience makes him well-suited to guide the professional society devoted exclusively to cardiac CT.

Lesser is the director of cardiovascular CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the Minneapolis Heart Institute/Abbott Northwestern Hospital and an adjunct associate professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota. His areas of expertise include cardiac MRI, vascular MRI, cardiac CT for both adult and pediatric patients, and vascular CT.

In addition, the newly announced board of directors has added five esteemed cardiologists, radiologists, Ph.D.s, surgeons, and technologists to assist the new leadership.

The remainder of the executive committee is as follows:

Immediate Past President - Matthew J. Budoff, M.D., FSCCT, professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and director of cardiac CT at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Center at Harbor UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif.

Secretary - Stephan Achenbach, M.D., FSCCT, professor of medicine, department of cardiology, University of Erlangen, Germany

For more information: www.scct.org

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