News | Breast Imaging | September 09, 2021

Same-day Mammogram Reading During COVID-19: Reduced Disparity, Faster Diagnosis

According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), immediately reading screening mammograms during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic promises a new and improved paradigm—reducing care disparities, while increasing the speed of diagnostic workup.

Flow Chart of Patient Selection

September 9, 2021 — According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), immediately reading screening mammograms during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic promises a new and improved paradigm—reducing care disparities, while increasing the speed of diagnostic workup.

“The immediate-read screening mammography program reduced prior racial and ethnic disparities in same-day diagnostic imaging after abnormal screening mammograms,” wrote first author Brian N. Dontchos, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

In May 2020, Dontchos et al. implemented a program wherein a dedicated breast imaging radiologist interpreted all screening mammograms in real-time, with patients receiving their results before being discharged. A separate radiologist made efforts to perform any recommended diagnostic imaging during the same visit. The team then retrospectively identified screening mammograms performed from June 1, 2019 to October 31, 2019 (pre-implementation; 8,222 examinations) or June 1, 2020 to October 31, 2020 (post-implementation; 7,235 examinations). 521 and 359 patients had abnormal screening examinations, respectively.

Before implementing this immediate-read screening mammography program, patients with races other than White had lower odds than White patients of having same-day diagnostic imaging after abnormal screening examinations (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10, 0.86; p=.03). After implementation, these odds were not significantly different (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.50, 1.71; p=.80).

Responding to the Society of Breast Imaging’s recommendation to reduce patient hospital visits during COVID-19, “we believe the practice is sustainable and not limited to only a transient period of lower-than-normal screening volumes,” the authors of this AJR article noted.

For more information: arrs.org

 

Related COVID-19 Cancer-care Information:

Female Breast Cancer Surpasses Lung as the Most Commonly Diagnosed Cancer Worldwide

Johns Hopkins Medicine Expert Weighs Devastating Impact of COVID-19 on Healthcare Workers

Radiation Oncologists Urge Congress to Advance Bills That Protect Patient Access to Cancer Care During Pandemic

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Related Content

Strategies to help guide nuclear radiology teams at various healthcare systems in 2021 and beyond
Feature | Nuclear Imaging | September 16, 2021 | By Staff of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC)
A year after COVID-19 turned the world upside do
This is an example of 3-D ultrasound imaging on a breast, designed to help increase efficiency and diagnostic accuracy in any practice. Image courtesy of Hologic.

This is an example of TriVu ultrasound imaging on a breast, designed to help increase efficiency and diagnostic accuracy in any practice. Image courtesy of Hologic.

Feature | Breast Imaging | September 15, 2021 | By Jennifer Meade
The...
While the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) and the introduction of EQUIP (Enhancing Quality Using the Inspection Program) have been successful in standardizing and enhancing mammographic imaging quality, inadequate breast positioning can dramatically impact the ability of radiologists and technicians to quickly and accurately detect breast cancer and potentially malignant lesions in their patients

Getty Images

Feature | Mammography | September 15, 2021 | By Christopher Austin, M.D. and Randy D. Hicks, M.D., MBA
As with all imaging technologies, COVID-19 is expected to continue to negatively impact the market.

Courtesy of Grand View Research

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 14, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
With a wealth of landmark studies in Breast, Cervical, Melanoma, Prostate, Colorectal, Oesophagus, Endocrine and Lung cancer, the ESMO Congress 2021 is a clear demonstration that oncology research has once again gathered momentum after being temporarily stopped in its tracks by the outbreak of the virus

Getty Images

News | Radiation Oncology | September 13, 2021
September 13, 2021 — At the opening press conference of the ...
Plan to attend RSNA21 at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | September 13, 2021
September 13, 2021 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) today announced highlights of the Technical Exh
Laws designed to help women with increased risk for missed breast cancer diagnoses may help catch the disease earlier, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Getty Images | AleksandarNakic

News | Breast Imaging | September 09, 2021
September 9, 2021 — Laws designed to help women with increased risk for...
The researchers say there is currently a lack of good quality evidence to support a policy of replacing human radiologists with artificial intelligence (AI) technology when screening for breast cancer.

Getty Images

News | Artificial Intelligence | September 02, 2021
September 2, 2021 — Humans still seem to be better than technology when it comes to the accuracy of spotting possible