News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 30, 2020

RSNA Announces a COVID-19 Imaging Data Repository

RSNA's open data repository will compile images and correlative data to create a comprehensive source for COVID-19 research and education efforts

RSNA's open data repository will compile images and correlative data to create a comprehensive source for COVID-19 research and education efforts #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

March 30, 2020 — The medical imaging community around the world is uniting to help address the COVID-19 pandemic. The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) continues to build on its extensive body of COVID-19 research and education resources, announcing a new initiative to build a COVID-19 Imaging Data Repository.

The open data repository will compile images and correlative data from institutions, practices and societies around the world to create a comprehensive source for COVID-19 research and education efforts. The image hosting, annotation and analysis framework will enable researchers to understand epidemiological trends and to generate new AI algorithms to assist with COVID-19 disease detection, differentiation from other pneumonias and quantification of lung involvement on CT for prognosis or therapy planning.

“RSNA is committed to accelerating collaborative research and education on the uses of medical imaging to address diagnosis and imaging-based treatment of COVID-19,” said Curtis P. Langlotz, M.D., Ph.D., RSNA Board Liaison for Information Technology and Annual Meeting. “Because RSNA is a leader in connecting radiologists around the world, we have received a wave of requests from organizations interested in sharing imaging data, as well as from individuals and organizations seeking access to such data for research and education.

In response to these requests, RSNA is releasing a survey for representatives of radiology organizations that may be willing to share COVID-19-related imaging data. The survey will help RSNA collect all available resources into a unified repository for international COVID-19 imaging research and education efforts. 

This initiative builds on RSNA’s long history of enabling image data sharing, research and technologic innovation. For more than 20 years, RSNA has sponsored the development and implementation of data standards, including DICOM, IHE, RadLex, Image Share and QIBA. In the past few years, RSNA has helped accelerate research into the application of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging by collecting and labeling data and organizing competitions that engage thousands of teams to test the ability of AI systems to perform clinically relevant tasks.

Like those efforts, the success of the COVID-19 Imaging Data Repository will depend on collaboration with many other interested organizations. Today, RSNA is announcing an agreement to collaborate closely with the European Imaging COVID-19 AI initiative, supported by the European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics.

The organizations expressed the common goal of creating a secure way to share COVID-19 imaging, in order to assess lung involvement more accurately with AI. They will collaborate to enable hospitals to provide imaging data securely and efficiently with researchers, respecting privacy and ethical principles. They will define and publish protocols for selecting and labeling imaging data associated with COVID-19 as a tool for researchers and practitioners. Other interested organizations are invited to join this coalition to share information and facilitate a rapid response to COVID-19.

Organizations are requested to use the survey form linked here (bit.ly/rsna-covid-data) to provide information about COVID-19 imaging data they may be willing share for research. Responses are requested by April 15, 2020.

For more information: www.rsna.org

Related Coronavirus Content:

VIDEO: Use of Telemedicine in Medical Imaging During COVID-19

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19

 CDRH Issues Letter to Industry on COVID-19

Qure.ai Launches Solutions to Help Tackle COVID19 

ASRT Deploys COVID-19 Resources for Educational Programs

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Deployment of Health IT in China’s Fight Against the COVID-19 Epidemic

Emerging Technologies Proving Value in Chinese Coronavirus Fight

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

Coronavirus Update from the FDA

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

CT Imaging Features of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Chest CT Findings of Patients Infected With Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia 

Find more related clinical content Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Related Content

 Recently the versatility of mixed and augmented reality products has come to the forefront of the news, with an Imperial led project at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Doctors have been wearing the Microsoft Hololens headsets whilst working on the front lines of the COVID pandemic, to aid them in their care for their patients. IDTechEx have previously researched this market area in its report “Augmented, Mixed and Virtual Reality 2020-2030: Forecasts, Markets and Technologies”, which predicts th

Doctors wearing the Hololens Device. Source: Imperial.ac.uk

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 22, 2020
May 22, 2020 — Recently the versatility of
Lymphocytic Inflammation in a Lung from a Patient Who Died from Covid-19. The gross appearance of a lung from a patient who died from coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is shown in Panel A (the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm). The histopathological examination, shown in Panel B, revealed interstitial and perivascular predominantly lymphocytic pneumonia with multifocal endothelialitis (hematoxylin–eosin staining; the scale bar corresponds to 200 μm).

Lymphocytic Inflammation in a Lung from a Patient Who Died from Covid-19. The gross appearance of a lung from a patient who died from coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is shown in Panel A (the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm). The histopathological examination, shown in Panel B, revealed interstitial and perivascular predominantly lymphocytic pneumonia with multifocal endothelialitis (hematoxylin–eosin staining; the scale bar corresponds to 200 μm). Image courtesy of The New England Journal of Medicine

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 22, 2020
May 22, 2020 — In a new study in the New
Despite facing challenges such as limited access to personal protective equipment (PPE) following the COVID-19 outbreak, radiation oncology clinics quickly implemented safety and process enhancements that allowed them to continue caring for cancer patients, according to a new national survey from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 21, 2020
May 21, 2020 — Despite facing challenges such as limited access to...
Remote reading of imaging studies on home picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations can contribute to social distancing, protect vulnerable radiologists and others in the hospital, and ensure seamless interpretation capabilities in emergency scenarios, according to an open-access article published ahead-of-print by the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

Srini Tridandapani, M.D., Ph.D.

News | PACS | May 21, 2020
May 21, 2020 — 
Actionable insight “beyond the diagnosis” enables health researchers to better understand COVID-19 progression, intervention effectiveness, and impacts on healthcare system
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 20, 2020
May 20, 2020 — Change Healthcare introduced ...
Butterfly iQ devices provide revolutionary portable ultrasound capabilities for faster and easier screening and monitoring
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 20, 2020
May 20, 2020 —Atrium Health is one of the first major health systems in the nation to put into wide practice a new...
The Breast Imaging and Reporting System (BI-RADS) was established by the American College of Radiology to help classify findings on mammography. Findings are classified based on the risk of breast cancer, with a BI-RADS 2 lesion being benign, or not cancerous, and BI-RADS 6 representing a lesion that is biopsy-proven to be malignant.

Getty Images

News | Breast Imaging | May 19, 2020
May 19, 2020 — Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up sur