News | August 31, 2009

Radiolucent Cranial Stabilization Takes the Spotlight at Neurological Surgery Conference

 cranial stabilization

Aug. 31, 2009 - Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corp. is featuring the MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Radiolucent Cranial Stabilization system, which provides rigid skeletal fixation of a patient's skull for use in neurosurgical procedures that utilize X-ray, fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) or CT imaging modalities, at the XIV World Congress of Neurological Surgery in Boston, Mass., Aug.30 - Sep. 3, 2009.

The MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Skull Clamp has received 510(k) clearance from the United States Food and Drug Administration and CE Mark Certification in the European Union.

Many cerebrovascular procedures, such as aneurysm and arteriovenous malformation (AVM) repair, require fluoroscopy to visualize blood vessels in the bony environment of the skull. Fluoroscopy is also used in the precise placement of cervical spinal implants. Both types of procedures require rigid skeletal fixation. Metal cranial stabilization equipment can cause unwanted image artifacts that hinder the capabilities and usefulness of the fluoroscopy image. The new MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Radiolucent system allows neurosurgeons to perform fluoroscopy during neurosurgical procedures without compromising image quality. In addition, the new system has been specifically designed to meet the positioning challenges posed by the small size of the pediatric patient.

The MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Radiolucent Cranial Stabilization System consists of the XR2 Skull Clamp, along with the more robust XR2 Base Unit, and the XR2 Tri-Star Adaptor for use with image guided surgical systems. The MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Base Unit provides a wide imaging window and easy-to-assemble linkage; it is constructed with composite materials for improved rigidity, strength and durability, all while retaining a high versatility of product maneuverability for optimal patient positioning. The MAYFIELD Infinity XR2 Skull Clamp includes both a quarter turn lock/unlock mechanism on the dual-pin side for easier application to the patient's head, and the unique ability to switch the dual-pin rocker arm from adult to pediatric, quickly and without tools.

For more information: www.Integra-LS.com

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