Technology | January 26, 2009

Philips’ New Ultrasound Targets Women’s Needs

January 27, 2009 - At Arab Health 2009 Royal Philips launched a new ultrasound system, the HD9, which focuses on helping clinicians deliver high quality care for a full range of women’s health needs.

The HD9 combines advanced imaging technology, including 3D and 4D capabilities, designed for an easy-to-use system for obstetrics, gynecology and breast imaging.

The HD9 system delivers a set of workflow features that help ensure imaging and processing are as efficient as possible, potentially saving time in busy clinics. The HD9 has also been built to withstand rigorous use and provide all the capabilities needed for day-to-day applications. It also includes advanced features such as intuitive 3D and 4D imaging designed for those new to volume imaging as well as experienced users.

As well as women’s health, the HD9 is also able to cater for applications, including general imaging, adult and pediatric cardiology, general pediatric and urology.

The HD9 is part of Philips’ extensive HD family of cost-effective ultrasound systems, which also includes the HD3, the HD7, the HD11 XE and the HD15 introduced in 2008. Philips HD systems can be configured for a full range of applications.

The HD9’s array of features include:
• Philips Live iSlice, which enables clinicians to focus on specific areas of interest within a volume and find images with the best views and content, designed for confident diagnoses.
• Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) to evaluate fetal heart anatomy and function by allowing clinicians to create a volume image that can be displayed and interrogated during playback.
• Tissue Specific Imaging technology additionally allows the system to be optimized for a specific patient or examination type, to provide excellent imaging quality with little need for optimization.
• Tissue aberration correction, which is said to offer speed of sound compensation for clear and accurate data even in difficult to image patients.

The HD9 will be available in many countries from March 2009, including North America.

For more information: www.philips.com/HD9

Related Content

Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Fat Distribution in Women and Men Provides Clues to Heart Attack Risk
News | Women's Health | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – It’s not the amount of fat in your body but where it is stored that may increase your risk for hea
Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | January 11, 2018
Mindray recently featured a new upgrade for its premium Resona 7 ultrasound system at the Radiological Society of North...
Women Prefer Getting Mammograms Every Year
News | Mammography | January 09, 2018
Women prefer to get their mammograms every year, instead of every two years, according to a new study presented at the...
Planmed Clarity 2-D Digital Mammography System Receives FDA Approval
Technology | Mammography | January 08, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an approval letter for the Planmed Clarity 2-D full-field digital...
Overweight Women May Need More Frequent Mammograms
News | Mammography | January 04, 2018
Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become...
New International Report Provides Comprehensive Guide to Imaging in Chagas Heart Disease
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 03, 2018
Chagas disease (ChD), an infectious parasitic disease transmitted primarily by triatomine insects, has become a...
About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

Feature | Breast Imaging | January 02, 2018 | Kathryn Pearson Peyton, M.D.
Sixty million women undergo regular screening mammography in the United States, but even in the digital age, it is di
Imagio Opto-Acoustic Breast Imaging System Helps Differentiate Tumor Subtypes
News | Oncology Diagnostics | January 02, 2018
Seno Medical Instruments Inc. (Seno Medical) recently reported data from their clinical study demonstrating that its...
Study Finds Link Between Breast Cancer Treatments and Cellular Aging Markers
News | Women's Health | January 02, 2018
January 2, 2018 — A new study found women who had received chemotherapy and/or...
Overlay Init