News | April 28, 2009

PET Scanning Guide Helps Doctors Treat Variety of Cancers

April 28, 2009 - Experts have compiled a comprehensive overview of the literature regarding the usefulness of PET imaging for the treatment of several cancers, "Personalizing Cancer Therapy with FDG PET: From RECIST to PERCIST," providing a compilation of results of therapeutic regimens across a broad range of cancers published as a supplement to The Journal of Nuclear Medicine

The reference tool presents the most up-to-date information about the use of fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for monitoring therapy and treatment of many different cancers. Internationally recognized PET imaging specialists and oncologists contributed to and developed this new supplement.

FDG-PET is a noninvasive, painless molecular imaging technology that allows physicians to determine how organs and tissues inside the body are functioning on a molecular and cellular level. In the past, collecting information about tumor response in a structured and meaningful format was difficult. As a result, generally accepted criteria for response assessment in solid tumors did not exist. Because each patient is unique, oncologists have no way of accurately predicting which patient will benefit from a specific therapy.

Those involved in the production of the new supplement believe that the international guidelines and criteria for response assessment using PET in solid tumors provided by the new periodical may notably alter cancer treatment and prognosis.

“The literature in this publication suggests that FDG-PET could play a significant role in personalizing the treatment of malignant tumors,” said Wolfgang Weber, M.D., editor of the supplement and medical director with the division of nuclear medicine at the Albert-Ludwigs University in Freiburg, Germany. “It could positively impact patient care by providing access to critical imaging procedures to ensure that patients get the right treatment early on in their cancer.”

Most anticancer drugs are effective only in subgroups of patients, and many of the various techniques developed to monitor tumor response to these drugs have proven to be inadequate. “FDG PET imaging, on the other hand, has been shown to improve response assessment in several tumor types, such as lymphoma, and a variety of single-center studies have shown that FDG PET may provide earlier or more accurate assessment of tumor response in other types of cancer.

Because the supplement aims to present a careful discussion of the available literature and provide guidance for treatment monitoring with FDG-PET, researchers involved in a wide range of cancer studies were given templates to use for reporting purposes to ensure that data was collected in a meaningful way. The researchers then methodically summarized strengths and weaknesses of various approaches for predicting or monitoring tumor response, and described common methodological differences between individual studies and their effects on the reported diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET.

“Previously, researchers used different criteria and their results were inconsistent,” explained Weber. “The tabulated format we required for this publication provided the necessary structure to gather data and made it possible to compare results from different studies, making it easier for doctors to find valuable information in a uniformly structured and centralized location.”

Source: The Journal of Nuclear Medicine

For more information: www.snm.org

Related Content

PET Tracer Identifies Estrogen Receptor Expression Differences in Breast Cancer Patients
News | PET Imaging | August 09, 2018
In metastatic breast cancer, prognosis and treatment is largely influenced by estrogen receptor (ER) expression of the...
Novel PET Imaging Method Could Track and Guide Type 1 Diabetes Therapy
News | PET Imaging | August 03, 2018
Researchers have discovered a new nuclear medicine test that could improve care of patients with type 1 diabetes. The...
Researchers Trace Parkinson’s Damage in the Heart
News | PET Imaging | July 17, 2018
A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson’s researchers test new therapies and...
Siemens Healthineers Announces FDA Clearance of syngo.via VB30 Molecular Imaging Software
Technology | Nuclear Imaging | July 16, 2018
At the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), June 23-26 in Philadelphia...
SNMMI Image of the Year Highlights Theranostic Approach for Advanced Prostate Cancer

IMAGE OF THE YEAR: PSMA PET before and after lutetium-177 PSMA617 theranostics in 8 patients with metastatic prostate cancer who exhausted standard therapeutic options.

68Ga-PSMA11 PET maximum intensity projection (MIP) images at baseline and 3 months after 177Lu-PSMA617 in 8 patients with PSA decline ≥ 98 percent in a prospective phase II study. Any disease with SUV over 3 is in red. Credit: Michael Hofman, John Violet, Shahneen Sandhu, Justin Ferdinandus, Amir Iravani, Grace Kong, Aravind Ravi Kumar, Tim Akhurst, Sue Ping Thang, Price Jackson, Mark Scalzo, Scott Williams and Rodney Hicks, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

News | PET Imaging | June 29, 2018
In the battle against metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, studies have demonstrated a high response rate to...
MILabs Introduces Futuristic PET Capabilities on New VECTor6 System
Technology | PET Imaging | June 28, 2018
At the 2018 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) annual meeting, June 23-26, in Philadelphia,...
Philips North America and GE Healthcare Win IMV PET Imaging ServiceTrak Awards
News | PET Imaging | June 25, 2018
IMV, part of the Science and Medicine Group and a market research and business intelligence provider to the imaging...
FDA Clears New Imaging Functionalities for Biograph mCT PET/CT Systems
Technology | PET-CT | June 21, 2018
Siemens Healthineers will announce U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of four new system features for...
PET/CT Changes Care for 59 Percent of Suspected Recurrent Prostate Cancer Cases
News | Prostate Cancer | June 13, 2018
A recently presented investigational clinical trial evaluated the impact of 18F fluciclovine positron emission...
Nuclear imaging scan showing very good tissue delineation. Scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers.

Nuclear imaging scan showing very good tissue delineation. It offers crisp overall image quality and sharply delineates the muscle and fat planes, vertebral margins and end plates, billiary radicals, renal calyces, aortic wall and papillary muscles of the heart. Scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers.

Technology | PET-CT | June 05, 2018
June 5, 2018 — The U.S.
Overlay Init