Case Study | May 11, 2011

Performing Dual Embolizations in a Single Session of Treatment

Arteriogram - questionable hypervascular mass
Repeat 3-D CT spin confirms success of embolization

Repeat 3-D CT spin confirms success of embolization

Michael Ringold, M.D., an interventional radiologist at St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, Pa., shared a case in which he used GE Healthcare’s Innova 4100 IQ interventional imaging system to perform dual embolizations on a 56-year-old man with liver cancer.

Case History

The patient had undergone a previous embolization of a large tumor located in the left lateral segment of his liver. When the patient was seen for a follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan, the CT image displayed retention of the embolic agent in approximately 85 percent of the tumor. A new nodule was also identified in the right lobe of his liver. This nodule was not present in the previous study. The patient was scheduled for a repeat embolization of the large mass and an embolization of the right hepatic nodule.

Procedure Performed Using Innova 4100 IQ System

An arteriogram on the tumor in the left segment was performed to determine the blood supply to the remainder of the tumor. Guided by Innova’s excellent image quality, the catheter was repositioned and Ringold re-embolized the vessel supplying blood to the remaining 15 percent of the mass. A repeat arteriogram helped Ringold to confirm the success of the embolization.

His focus then shifted to the nodule in the right lobe. Using Innova CT, a 3-D CT of the liver was performed. It clearly showed the artery that was supplying the nodule. Ringold repositioned the catheter to embolize the vessel.

Arteriograms, embolizations and confirmations all performed in a single session. By using the Innova CT application, the patient did not have to be taken off the table. The entire procedure was performed in a single session without transferring the patient.

Case Summary

The patient tolerated the procedure well and left the department in stable condition. He was scheduled to obtain a follow-up CT angiography (CTA) as an outpatient.

To view this case on video, visit:

http://www.youtube.com/gehealthcare#p/search/0/YoaPd-0HZnE

About GE Healthcare

GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services that are shaping a new age of patient care. Its broad expertise in medical imaging and information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies, performance improvement and performance solutions services help customers to deliver better care to more people at a lower cost. In addition, GE partners with healthcare leaders, striving to leverage the global policy change necessary to implement a successful shift to sustainable healthcare systems.

GE's “healthymagination” vision for the future invites the world to join us on our journey as we continuously develop innovations focused on reducing costs, increasing access and improving quality around the world. Headquartered in the United Kingdom, GE Healthcare is a unit of General Electric Company. Worldwide, GE Healthcare employees serve healthcare professionals and in more than 100 countries.

Healthymagination is GE’s $6 billion commitment to bring high-quality health care at lower cost to more people around the world through our advanced technologies, and research and development capabilities. Just as ecomagination applies GE scale and innovation toward tackling environmental challenges, healthymagination offers dramatic new investments toward achieving sustainable health.

This case study was supplied by GE Healthcare.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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